CLICK HERE FOR THE HAWAII FIVE-O DISCUSSION FORUM

    Other TV Shows Discussion Forum




Comments:
Ironside S04E02 - No Game For Amateurs

I got the season 4 set of Ironside out of the library to see if Ironside was still as crabby as he was in the first season episodes. He was not, though he was still pretty annoyed because Richy Bolton (Carl Reindel), a crucial witness who had just finished testifying at the grand jury against local mob figure Arnie Lane (Tony Brande), was knocked off on the steps of the courthouse.

The guy doing the assassinating was Martin Sheen, playing "Johnny," a professional killer working for Lane. Johnny had insinuated himself into a group of local draft dodgers as a cover, and got Nancy O'Dwyer (Pamela McMyler), a massively pregnant woman who was very sympathetic to the peace movement because her husband had been killed in Vietnam on his third day there, to accompany him to a building across the street from the courthouse where he knocked off Bolton from one of the upper floors using a long-range rifle.

Nancy was seen alone in the lobby waiting for Johnny and later leaving the building with him by several people, including a cop who recognized her from a picture in the newspaper at a recent demonstration. Nancy is hauled down to the police station and grilled by Ironside who manages to overcome what you would expect to be antipathy to the "pigs" by appealing to her anti-violent nature because she was betrayed by killer Johnny. IDing Johnny is not easy, because he and the other draft resisters in the show are cautioned about talking too much about their past history (or even using their real names) to avoid being required to testify about each other if they are busted.

As in a Streets of San Francisco episode, it seems like there is only one draft resistance organization in San Francisco, run by a guy named Phil (Michael Greer), who looks more like a beatnik than a hippie. Mark (Don Mitchell), the black guy from Ironside's team, meets with Phil at the Cat's Cradle coffee house, pretending he wants to leave the country rather than go to Vietnam, tipped off with info on how to contact Phil from Nancy.

Johnny manages to get himself also lined up for a "trip to the border" (or at least to a place in Oregon on the way to the border) along with a couple of other draft dodgers driven there by Phil, but as they are heading out of town, Johnny figures out that something is fishy about meeting some other guy on the way. This "other guy" is Mark, and a police stakeout is set up at the meeting point. On the way, Johnny recognizes Mark after he has a flashback to the killing of Bolton where Mark was present in the background, and has a pretty rude line to Mark: "Don't let anybody tell you [that] you [i.e., black people] 'all look alike'."

After he avoids getting grabbed at the stakeout and essentially takes Mark hostage, the San Francisco cops manage to grab Johnny further down the highway to Oregon in a rather anti-climactic finale to the show.

At the end, Phil and Nancy meet with Ironside who says that he will have to make a report to the authorities about the "underground railroad" but Phil just says that they will "have to change the station."

The video quality of this episode was pretty bad. The opening shot looked out of focus and there were several night time scenes where you couldn't see what was going on at all. The show also perpetuated a stupid Canadian stereotype, that suggests all people who live here say "aboot" instead of "about." It ain't true!


Added: September 20 2017 07:42:40 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF episode "Dead Air":

This show is good for Larry Hagman's portrayal of sleazy advice-dispensing radio talk show host Terry Vine who gets a bit too involved with some of his female callers (the program is aimed at women who are having "relationship" problems). But there are a lot of questions.

His engineer Frank is played by George DiCenzo. Their relationship is like "cats and dogs," according to Frank near the end of the show. But since the show is only an hour long, whether they were adversarial before the events portrayed in it is not developed very well. You would expect that considering the power Vine has, he could get Frank fired easily. The two of them come to physical blows at one point, with Frank saying that he could easily whip Vine in a fight, though DiCenzo doesn't seem physically stronger. At the end, Frank tells Vine "Shut up, fink," which seems much too strong.

There are several red herrings in the show plus a double-twist ending.

First, although Vine is suspected of being a double killer, Vine's receptionist Penny (Ina Balin) is actually the one who knocks off two women, one of whom Vine knocked up and the other one who was blackmailing him because one of her co-workers was the one who he impregnated. Penny was also the one who took shots at Vine and his girl friend Barbara Tyler (Arlene Golonka, who looks very sexy in a bikini earlier on in the show). Barbara happens to be the daughter of a media baron (Dennis Patrick) who offers Vine a lucrative job at his radio station in Los Angeles.

Then, at the end of the show, Vine expounds to Frank, the two still being on speaking terms, on what he really thinks of his job, starting out by referring to his women callers as "hot-eyed, slobbering broads." Vine is unaware that Frank has left Vine's microphone "on," so this rant goes out over the airwaves, dashing Vine's new job with his girl friend's father.

I can't figure out how Penny, who has had hot pants for Vine for a long time, gets information which makes her a killer.

At the end of the show Stone says that "someone doctored those tapes [tapes of crank calls which were never heard on the air, but were given to Penny for some reason] and it could've been Penny." I originally thought that Penny was the one who was making a couple of crank calls threatening to kill Vine, but this doesn't make any sense, because it would require a certain technical expertise to modify her voice. If Penny then killed the women, this "caller" could be blamed. It would be impossible to figure out who this person was, because call display seemingly was not available at the station to determine the number of the caller.

Then I thought that Penny, being the receptionist, could have overheard private calls from the two now-dead women made directly to Vine. But does this make sense? Would the pregnant one have discussed details about her condition to Vine over the phone at his job, and would the blackmailing one also have gone into details over the phone (I recall she just left a number for Vine to call her to arrange a meeting, she didn't want to talk over the phone about her plan).

There >is< a big "AHA" moment at the end when it is revealed that Vine kept a gun in his desk drawer and that only he and Penny knew about it (and, of course, this is the gun that Penny used to kill the two women).


Added: September 15 2017 08:23:00 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I found a much better internet version of the Gilligan's Island/Five-O interlude music used in the GI Tongo the Ape Man episode. Since we're not suppose to attach links, google it.

Gilligan's Island Our Vines Have Tender Apes S03E20 on DailyMotion

The music starts at the 12:48 mark.


Added: September 13 2017 12:23:33 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I watched this Mannix episode with Audree Norton (the deaf woman). I agree it was very good and there is even a score by Lalo Schifrin himself. But there are a few picky things. Ward gives Mannix the keys to his car to deliver the money, but when Mannix returns, he doesn't give the key back. Later when Mannix goes back to pick up the money, Ward says he will "leave them [the instructions on how to do this] in the same car." Presumably the key is still in the car or Mannix kept it, though I dunno why! When Mannix returns to the drop-off location to get the money, if you look carefully at Ward's car, you will notice that it is much dustier when Mannix leaves after Jason Evers shoots at him than when Mannix arrived. And why is it that Evers, a professional killer and presumably a sharpshooter, can't hit the side of a barn door, or more specifically, Mannix? When the car goes over a cliff and blows up (looking very much like a stock shot from classic Five-O), the car is going away from Evers, so I wonder how he can see it?

Added: September 11 2017 03:40:09 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
That episode with Audree Norton is my all-time favorite MANNIX episode. An excellent opener to season 2. She really is deaf in real life. She even gets special credit for this in that episode. That was just a fantastic episode and Jason Evers was a remorseless cold-blooded killer there. If more MANNIX episodes were like that one I'd have been a more loyal viewer. Unfortunately too many of them tended to trade in genuine suspense for unnecessarily convoluted storylines. Mike Connors was consistently great though!

Added: September 11 2017 08:22:46 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Speaking of handicapped people on TV, I recently watched the Pat Hingle episode of SOSF where he is this salesman who is a Class A bullshitter who gets in big trouble because he totally embellishes a story to "help" Stone and Keller track down these guys who pulled off a jewelry robbery. This story has a lot of parallels to "The Takers" from season one, the excellent episode with Harold Gould (the Hingle show is also very good).

Anyway, there is this woman who comes to the squad room who is deaf, but she can speak in that way that deaf people do so you can still understand them (there must be a politically correct term for this kind of person, I think it might be just "deaf" as opposed to "deaf mute" [which suggests she cannot speak at all] or the not very acceptable "deaf and dumb").

Anyway, this woman (played by Audree Norton who is not even in the end credits -- she was also in a Mannix show) tells the boys information that totally negates what Hingle told them earlier. I don't understand why he told them what he did -- is it because he is a kind of person who is always exaggerating everything? Or did he think he would get 15 minutes of fame from doing this (and perhaps increase his business peddling jewelry and stuff which even he admits is "junk")?

When Hingle appears on TV as a "concerned citizen" who gave the cops information about the robbers, he looks very nervous ... as if he realizes he shouldn't be appearing in such a public way because you know darn well the robbers will come after him (and the guy who he identified predictably does this!).


Added: September 11 2017 07:34:21 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I saw the second episode of IRONSIDE "The Leaf in the Forest" about this serial killer who strangles elderly women. But Ironside suspects that this one woman was not killed by the strangler. There is this totally idiotic theory that Ironside has where he can determine what exactly the old woman was reading just before she got killed. He "determines" that she was reading the back of the newspaper because the newspaper was laying on the ground with the front page facing up (with a shoe print on it). That's right, according to Sherlock Ironside when a person drops a newspaper they will ALWAYS drop it with the side they were reading towards the bottom, facing the floor. And I'm like REALLY??? SAYS WHO??? Just the opposite - I'm likely to drop the paper just as I'm holding it, meaning the side that I'm reading will be facing up. Why would I flip it over and then drop it?? I swear it's the dumbest thing I've ever heard! Who wrote this? A grade-schooler??? What kind of a clue is that?? DUMB!! I went back and read Mike's comments on this episode and he too noticed this idiocy.

I agree that Ironside is really crabby all the time. Actually he's pretty much an ass. He's totally unlikable and not even his paralysis gets any empathy out of me. He constantly bosses all of them around, calls them "children", chides them whenever they disagree with him or can't keep up with his "brilliance", barks and grumbles at them. I'm like WHAT THE HECK??! Who does he think he is?? At one point in the episode he's laying in bed and grumpy as usual picks up a whistle and whistles really hard which prompts the black guy to jump to his feet and immediately run to him LOL! If I worked for him I'd push him in his wheelchair down the stairs. I also can't stand that stupid looking WWII truck that he's constantly being driven around in. I can't imagine anyone under 70 liking this show. You have to either be disabled or be a real grouch to like this one. I can't believe that Raymond Burr was nominated 5 times (FIVE TIMES!!!!!) in a row as Best Actor for this nonsense. Not only is the character totally unlikable but his performance is so damn booooring!!! Honestly I thought he was boring as Perry Mason too (hence why I preferred Andy Griffith in MATLOCK) but here he's just painful to watch. To think that Telly Savalas was only nominated twice for KOJAK and Jack Lord not even once but "crab face" gets 5 in a row!!!?? Ridiculous!!


Added: September 10 2017 08:21:35 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Yo, Mike! I hear ya about these "special guest stars" :D

I'm less offended by Walden and Golonka than I am by Hari Rhodes. He's the ultimate offender. I had never even heard of him before seeing him on SOSF. I had seen Golonka in other things and she specialized in playing these dumb-blond bubbly types (I think she was a regular on the ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW spin-off MAYBERRY RFD too) and Walden of course later found some fame on LOU GRANT. Though I still don't get how Walden was a special guest star at this period in the 70s, prior to LOU GRANT. Nothing on his resume shows anything of note during this period, aside from the usual guest starring roles on TV.


Added: September 10 2017 02:27:07 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Ringfire, check this out...

S04E09 - Web of Lies - with guest stars Pat Hingle, Nancy Olson, Wayne Maunder, special guest star ROBERT WALDEN!!!

S04E10 - Dead Air - with guest stars Larry Hagman, Ina Balin, George Di Cenzo, Dennis Patrick, special guest star ARLENE GOLONKA!!!


Added: September 09 2017 05:04:39 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S04E08: "Trail of Terror" -- review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-4.htm#8


Added: September 08 2017 06:39:37 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
There is something else about Trail of Terror that is dumb. The "senior officer" of the navy men is shown buying rifles at some gun store in the rinky-dink town where Meg Foster lives. He is yelling at the elderly proprietor as if the guy doesn't understand what he is saying, or maybe he is trying to pull a fast one on this guy, saying that he is a navy man and therefore entitled to buy rifles or something? I dunno. There doesn't seem to be any of the usual waiting period involved, or is that only for pistols and not rifles? In the Robert Webber episode, Webber buys a pistol, but he can only get this after a lengthy approval procedure (much is made of this in the show).

Added: September 08 2017 05:40:06 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I watched the episode Trail of Terror, which stars James Woods as a psycho sailor, yesterday. The show had several problems.

First of all, I don't understand why Meg Foster suddenly freaked out and ran out of the apartment. She should have just stayed hidden and probably nobody would have seen her. [Actually, this was probably a good idea, because the sailors tossed the rooms in the apartment after she ran out, so they would probably have found her.]

James Woods' acting in this show was really annoying. Somebody should really have told this guy to put a cork in it.

At the end, the whole business about Stone in a helicopter was ridiculous. It looks like he is just at the top of the trees but he can seemingly see everything for miles around.

And Meg Foster saying that she knew the area really well is a bunch of baloney because it looks like they are not exactly near her house. They are like miles away from her house. So how did she experience all of this area when she was a kid or whatever -- it doesn't really make a lot of sense.

Oh yeah -- why does Stone have to keep his hat on when he's in the helicopter? :D


Added: September 06 2017 01:38:33 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Big Fan of Murder By Proxy. It's incredibly creative and well-written. Excellent cast of actors. Bradford Dillman, Gordon Jump, Marj Dusay,John Ritter etc. Has to be a winner. It could have worked out the way it was instructed. A couple of thugs hired to commit acts of crime and vandalism in a small area of houses. People tired of the break-ins and attacks and sell their houses to the corporate group. They might have gotten away with it but the Streets SF team learn of the residents being visited to buy their property. It's probably not as excellent as The Takers or Mask Of Death but it Murder By Proxy would be around 7 or 8 best episodes. JC

Added: September 05 2017 10:50:51 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Funny article about Keller's ties. I guess I never paid much attention to them. Might need to start now.

Added: September 04 2017 09:30:02 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S04E07: Murder by Proxy -- review:

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-4.htm#7


Added: September 04 2017 07:47:45 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Good batch of Streets of SF reviews Mr. Mike. I always enjoyed seeing Hari Rhodes in these 70's detective shows. He possessed a presence on screen and usually a cool character. See you have plenty 2 1/2 star rated Streets SF episodes. I remember seeing Deadly Silence a few times on Retro TV or maybe ME-TV. The Stone hearing problem was inconsistent as you mentioned. The Takers would be my FAV Streets SF you reviewed. It has an excellent script and enjoyed the apartment complex and swimming pool. Looks like a party every night! Baxley & Gould shined in their roles. Plenty of suspects just excellent. Poisoned Snow definitely in my Top 5. Clu Gallagher was outstanding in his role. Love when he mixes the powdery rat poison with the junk. It was realistic when they weighed the stash and started distributing it. Blockade was really good as well. Don Stroud usually gives a strong performance mostly in the villain roles. Probably liked him BEST as Nick Pierson the loving hit man in The Late John Louisiana. JC

Added: September 04 2017 11:53:05 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Article about Keller's neckties on SOSF!

https://www.criminalelement.com/blogs/2011/05/the-streets-of-san-f rancisco-the-ties-that-bind


Added: September 04 2017 08:55:07 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S04E06: "Deadly Silence" -- review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-4.htm#6


Added: September 02 2017 01:46:01 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E20: "Inferno" -- Review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#20


Added: September 01 2017 06:55:45 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
"Special Guest Star Hari Rhodes"??? That's ridiculous! Not Akins? Not Falana? But Rhodes. Really??

What next? Special guest star H.M. Wynant??? Special guest star Roy Jenson? Lol


Added: September 01 2017 04:52:42 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E19: "A String of Puppets" -- review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#19


Added: August 31 2017 12:40:52 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I saw the epilog of "Crossfire" and it is pretty bad. Sometimes their banter is just so forced and cheesy that you're begging for it to stop lol. By the way it's not Barry Bonds, it's Bobby Bonds, Barry's dad. Barry would have been only 10 in '74. [Got that, thanks - MQ]

Added: August 29 2017 06:54:36 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Russ's comment about wanting the rape victim to like him makes total sense. The guy is a major loser, probably has no experience with women at all, and he has been subjected to Stroud saying words to the effect that he will demonstrate how to get some "real action" and how "she'll be happy to see us and go with us." Russ is so dumb he doesn't "get it" what Stroud really means. I think he gets a big surprise about what does happen.

Added: August 29 2017 06:28:07 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E18: "Crossfire" - review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#18


Added: August 29 2017 06:22:24 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Russ's comment about wanting her to like him doesn't make any sense since he never had any contact with her. Unless he's talking about something that we didn't see. Like maybe he frequented that restaurant regularly and tried to pick her up. So in steps Donny Stroud to show him how it's done. Def creepy!

Added: August 29 2017 11:42:55 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
As far as Russ, the Charlie Martin Smith character is concerned, I think this guy is a bit off mentally. When he starts blabbing to his mother about his involvement in the crime, he says "I just wanted her [the rape/murder victim] to like me." Considering his mother has been looking after the judge's kids for 16 years, you have to wonder what happened to Russ's father. After all, there are laws about leaving kids on their own up to a certain age. Did the father die, or did he abandon the family? And what age was Russ when this happened? (There is no mention of the father in the show at all.) I think that Russ looks up to Stroud as kind of a father figure in the absence of his own father, which is creepy. I think Russ really "doesn't have much of a life." He is seriously messed up, that's for shure.

Added: August 29 2017 10:01:50 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I saw the Blockade episode and it's excellent! I might even place it ahead of Commitment (maybe). Don Stroud is a total psycho creep in that one. The way he tears open the roof of Cheryl Ladd's car and sticks his ugly mug in is like something out of a horror flick. Totally creepy! Poor Cheryl :(

There's a scene in Ida Lupino's house where Stroud is holding them all captive, after he's done threatening them, he just sits in that rocking chair rocking back and forth with a stupid grin on his face. Lol!

I don't know if that gizmo that he put in the engine to make the car stall is a real thing or not but it sure made sense. It cuts off the gas supply to the engine and provides just a little gas (which that gizmo contains) to the engine to make it go for just a little distance. Then that gas runs out and the car stalls. Makes sense to me.

One thing that I find weird is why would the "rabbit" (Charles Martin Smith lol - he does look like a rabbit!!) go along with this creep. I know that he probably didn't have any friends and seemed kinda neglected by mom Ida Lupino but what could he possibly have in common with a serial rapist like Stroud? Even more peculiar is what did he actually think was gonna happen that night when they trapped poor Cheryl? Was he really that stupid to think that's how you pick up girls? Stroud told him he was gonna show him how to have a good time. What did he think was gonna happen? They were gonna take Cheryl out to dinner? Or that she was just gonna take her clothes off for them and they would all have a good time? I don't get it. From the moment they started sabotaging her car he must have known this was not gonna end well.


Added: August 28 2017 08:52:59 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E17: "Blockade" - review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#17


Added: August 28 2017 06:48:57 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Yes it makes sense what you say. But on the other hand too much information may be seen as spoon-feeding the audience. I believe we should be smart enough to put 2 and 2 together. I guess it can be tricky. You gotta be able to walk that fine line between too much info and too little. Also keep in mind that some of the most memorable films are those where everything isn't exactly spelled out. Whereas those that have everything spelled out tend to be frowned upon.

As for SOSF vs Five-Faux. There's no comparison. I honestly don't remember a SOSF episode that's as stupid as the typical Faux episode. And I don't believe I'm being biased. In the 70s story telling was much more believable. Lenkov just throws anything and everything into the story that he can. SOSF never did that. All i have to think of is AOL scaling the side of that high rise like Spider-Man and all of a sudden everything in SOSF looks like brilliant writing in comparison. There's a huge difference between some things not being explained and brain-dead entertainment. Five-Faux is the latter.


Added: August 26 2017 12:33:44 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
The "problem" is that all this baloney is not defined in the show. Sure, you can speculate as to what happened, like we have done with Dedini being the mastermind in Commitment, but why should I have to second-guess the plot of a show because the writers are too lazy or stupid to do things correctly?

Admittedly, there may be issues with the fact that the writers >did< define this, but the information got edited out of the story somewhere, either by the story editor or the editor of the show itself (the guy who deals with the film).

An example of this kind of "editing" can be found in Kojak episode S01E06 (http://kojak.tv/kojak-1.htm#6) which has a "gay" theme along with the usual criminality, and some guy who had a minor part in this show posted on social media somewhere that "In this Kojak episode I am one of a gang of gay robbers." But there is absolutely nothing to suggest this in the show itself; it was obviously censored.

In the SOSF psychic show, there is a possible "hook" for Dillon and Rubiro being friends. Remember, Dillon got busted for stealing a car a couple of years ago (Stone hassles Dillon about this when he is doing his "bad cop" routine). Dillon said something like "Me and some pals got high and I stole a car, what's the big deal?" Maybe Rubiro was one of those "friends," therefore the two guys know each other and they ran into each other on the street. They went for a drink somewhere and Dillon told Rubiro that he was screwing this rich dame's daughter, so Rubiro, who was a gigolo, decided to make a play for the mother, and he found out she was really loaded. Now Rubiro was also in Madam's wacko group. Maybe he was "introduced" to the group by Mrs. Sloane? Or perhaps Rubiro saw Madam's nutty get-togethers as a good place to meet rich/older women, and maybe Rubiro cozied up to Madam as well, finding out she was a shady character (aside from running her scammy "chapel," and they decided to go into "business" together.

So there we have an explanation as to how Rubiro and Dillon were "pals." Don't forget that Dillon says that Rubiro gave him "a ride home" from somewhere, where was that? Actually, with all the ambiguity over these issues, I am really wondering if Dillon really wasn't involved in the plot in some way. It would certainly make it a lot easier to figure out how Rubiro's body ended up in the block of ice.

Seriously, if you are going to take "unanswered" stuff like this at face value and not question it, then I don't understand why you are not a big fan of Five-Zero where poorly written and/or edited scripts are the norm. (Actually, I was surprised that if you watch Five-Zero and your brain is numbed by the loud music/sound effects and fast pace, you will miss a LOT of details, but if you go back after the show is finished and either listen carefully or check out one of the subtitle sites on the internet, you will find out that in many cases, all these nitpicky things which you think were not there ARE there, usually a throwaway line by some minor character or whatever.)

With Five-Zero, in addition to stuff which is not defined, and therefore makes the show stupid, there are a lot more things which are defined and totally stupid. For example, when Chin Ho went to Mexico to check out his niece who had been kidnapped, all of the "ohana" went there as well (big issues with jurisdiction here, how can they operate as Five-Zero in Mexico, overriding the local authorities, blah blah blah), and suddenly Adam shows up at the door of their motel, and he was serving time in jail in Honolulu before he was released for good behavior, therefore he should be subject to parole rules about leaving the state!

Anyway, if you are going to just consider SOSF on the level of being "entertaining" or "a TV show" despite its flaws (and I have made exceptions to this rule myself!), I'm not going to make a federal case out of this. It's just that I (usually) like to have i's dotted and t's crossed, etc. That is the basis of "anal-ysis(R)", LOL.


Added: August 26 2017 10:30:20 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Well, Dillon does admit that the 2 were friends. So then what's the problem? I don't really see an issue. They were friends (from who knows where) and that's how Dillon was set up.

Are you saying them being friends is an unlikely coincidence?


Added: August 26 2017 09:05:01 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Here is the dialogue re the gun:

Stone: How did your prints happen to get on Rubero's shotgun?

Dillon: Rubiro set me up. I was the real pigeon. Rubiro, "my friend." That's why he offered me a ride home that day. He had the guns in the car. "Here, Dillon, look at the pretty little gun." My fingerprints all over the place.

None of the above explains anything, though!


Added: August 26 2017 12:03:57 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I think you're pretty much spot on with all this stuff. It's never specified that Dillon and Ribero were pals though. I'm guessing both are characters with a somewhat shady past and somehow ran into each other. I still say that it's possible Ribero was trying to sell him that shotgun. Maybe they ran into each other in a bar. Who knows?

I guess I can forgive Julie not hearing what was said from inside the trunk.


Added: August 25 2017 11:02:59 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I figure that Madam listened to Mrs. Sloane bitching about her prospective son-in-law, that he was a no good and an ex-con, so they (by "they," I assume that Madam, Mr. Stutter and Rubiro were a team) decided to make him the patsy. It sounds like Mrs. Sloane was a close pal of Madam for quite a while, a member of her wacky "circle" and so forth.

Rubiro had a skeet shooting set, and one of the guns (the shotgun) was missing when Stone and Keller went to his place, the one used to knock off Stutter. Rubiro used to like "doing it" with rich broads with no husbands, and a skeet shooting set would probably fit well into that lifestyle (perhaps there is a picture of him with one of those women shooting skeet in the show, I can't remember).

There is a lot of stuff missing from the script. Dillon says to Stone and Keller that he was set up by Rubiro who got him to handle the shotgun, it wasn't like he wanted to sell it to him, it's just that he wanted to show it to him because it was a truly swell gun or something like that and as a result Dillon's prints were all over the gun. I dunno how they could have preserved Dillon's finger prints so perfectly on this rifle, though! Where did they mention that Rubiro and Dillon were pals? I don't want to watch this show again just for this one line...

As far as the daughter not hearing "Olga" from the trunk, I have never been locked in a car trunk, so I dunno how much you can hear from the outside. What kind of car was this, anyway? One of those Ford products, like a huge boat? Maybe it was well insulated in the trunk so you couldn't hear dialog clearly.


Added: August 25 2017 10:00:47 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I rewatched the Chapel of the Damned episode which brought back lots of memories. It's a very good show!

Signe Hasso is pretty freaky, especially when she dresses as a man and then blasts Mr. Stutter away with a shot gun (that's just cold, man!!) That disguise was really good btw. With the exception of being a bit too short and slight she really did look like a man!! She also wears this Satanist star on her chest in the chapel scenes. Damn devil worshipper!

After he gets out of his car and just before he gets a shotgun blast to the face Mr. Stutter is heard saying something along the lines of "way to go OLGA!" but the kidnapped girl is right there in the trunk of his car. Wouldn't she have heard this and realized that Madam Olga is in on it? Or does she not know who she is or that her mom knows her? Still I would think she would have given the cops this bit of info, even if it meant nothing to her.

As for your question as to how Dillon and Rubiro knew each other, they mentioned that the kidnapped girl's boyfriend Dillon is an ex-con and it mentions that he did have some gun-related dealings with Rubiro. In fact Dillon says that Rubiro tried to sell him a gun and got him to touch it. That's how his fingerprints got on it.

As far as the note is concerned, yes that was from Dillon to the girl and I guess Madam Olga (or her accomplices) got that note and planted it at Rubiro's.


Added: August 25 2017 08:54:17 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Ringfire:

Stone and Keller go into the storage room when they return to the ice making place looking for Dillon (but he is not there, because he got fired).

Stone: Hey, come on, buddy boy. I get frostbite easy.
Keller: Buddy boy, huh?

By the way, don't you think it is peculiar when Keller meets Dillon in another cold room (with temperatures at 20 degrees F.) earlier in the show, that Dillon is not wearing any gloves?


Added: August 25 2017 08:28:04 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E08: "No Badge for Benjy" - review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#8


Added: August 25 2017 07:31:04 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
As I think about it I guess it makes sense for Dedini to be at the gym. Since he's the one setting up Mike he probably wants to stay close to make sure everything is going according to plan. If questioned he can just say he was following Lyman.

Mike, in the "Chapel" episode Stone pronounces Ferrari as "Ferreri" lol. That's a new one for me! Also you say that Keller uses the word "buddy boy" in this episode. When was that?


Added: August 25 2017 02:18:38 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Ringfire, Dedini's presence in the gym is interesting. To me, this suggests that Dedini is the master manipulator behind the whole business with Carlino's murder and setting up Stone for taking the fall. Dedini wanted to put all the blame on Stone because Carlino (whom Dedini would have been familiar with) was getting to close to closing his case on Lyman, and you can bet if Lyman was busted, he would probably start blabbing about Dedini's involvement with his organization. Is it possible that as part of his plan, Dedini got Lyman to intentionally meet Stone at the gym just so Dedini could later testify that he saw Stone and Lyman together? Dedini likely also arranged for Sims and Denny Miller to knock off Carlino. After all, don't forget when Sims and Miller are busted, Miller mentions "the cop ... who smashed up the old lady" meaning Dedini, which ties them in with him, though you would have to wonder how they would know about Dedini beating up Baxter's wife, which happened more recently than Carlino's murder (like >very< recently). Dedini is very slimy, because after Dexter makes a big case for Stone being guilty when the two of them are on the docks, Dedini, suddenly convinced, says "I think we'd better go downtown. I wanna make a full statement," which is when he says that he saw Stone and Lyman "together" at the gym, even though Stone couldn't care less about the dirty joke that Lyman wanted to tell him. If someone asked Dedini what was he doing at the gym, he could just say that he was keeping his eye on Lyman.

Added: August 25 2017 06:50:07 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E16: "Chapel of the Damned" -- review

http://thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#16


Added: August 23 2017 08:07:21 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Re: Commitment

I actually thought about the possibility of a shell casing still being left in the chamber. I thought maybe that's what Sims removed. But I didn't know whether this was realistic or not. Not being a gun expert I assumed all casings are always ejected. At least that's what you see in the movies. Guess I was right. Now it makes sense!

I agree that the case against Stone seemed pretty circumstantial. Decker seemed to be on some kind of a crusade to clean up the department, but I always thought the character was written this way to make him a red herring. I remember wondering if he might not be the dirty cop on Lyman's payroll. I didn't think it was Dedini. But answer me this. What's the significance of Dedini showing up at the boxing ring at the beginning and spotting Lyman and Stone together? I know Lyman was setting Stone up but for whose benefit was that? The only witness to this whole thing is the dirty cop himself. He later tells Decker that he saw Stone and Lyman together but he didn't need to be at the ring for this. He could have told Decker anything. Was Dedini trying to talk to Mike about something but then saw Lyman there and decided to back away? Or was this scene written before they decided to make Dedini bad, and then forgot to go back and fix it?

I agree with you about Collin Wilcox's special guest credit. The only thing she was really known for was TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD (in which she was VERY good) but she didn't really do much of anything outside of that. I remember a COLUMBO episode she was in but that's it. I'm pretty sure Sheen was a bigger star than her even at the time, and his star was a rising. He already had a few films under his belt. Maybe it's because he didn't have that one defining role the way she did. Maybe that's why she was a SGS.


Added: August 23 2017 12:03:04 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Ringfire, to deal specifically with some of the questions you asked:

- Carlino was shot with a .38-caliber weapon. This is presumably a .38-calibre Police Special: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.38_Special According to that page, "The .38 Special was the standard service cartridge of most police departments in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1990s."

- According to Stone after Decker asked for his gun to run a test on it, Stone said "It hasn't been fired," because he was unaware of what Sims (William Smith) had done to it.

- I don't know much about guns either, but I checked out a couple of YouTube videos. If you have a .38 police special, you load the thing with bullets, then shoot them. The casings are not ejected from the gun, you have to do this afterwards. So Sims shot Carlino dead, then took that casing out of the gun and replaced it with a new bullet and cleaned the gun. I'm surprised that they didn't examine Stone's clothing for gunshot residue (GSR), but according to Wikipedia, the history of GSR in investigations only dates back to 1971, so perhaps this technology was not a big thing when the show was being made.

- Stone was found on the ground according to Dedini when he is with Decker at the scene where Carlino was found dead. Decker asks "That X, that's where Stone went down?" There is nothing mentioned about whether Stone was conscious or unconscious when he was found, and no mention of who actually called the cops. Considering this is the proverbial "out of the way abandoned area of the docks" where Stone met Sims, I think it unlikely that someone was just walking in the area, though in a Kojak episode, some woman is on the "abandoned area of the docks" thinking about her life when a body is dumped and becomes a crucial witness. I wouldn't be surprised if it was Sims who called the cops anonymously -- after all, he was the one who set the whole thing up and wanted Stone to go down!

- Decker is a hotshot who has this "leave no stone unturned" (no pun intended) attitude towards solving the case. He is not interested in "gut instinct" ways of dealing with the issues, for example that Stone has been on the police force for 20+ years (23 years in this show, 27 in another), has been totally honest, never shown signs of corruption, etc. Of course, you can say that the fact that Stone has been on the force for so long is irrelevant, because Dedini has known Stone for 11 years and he is dirty (though Dedini has only been in Lyman's employ for 3 years). According to Keller, Decker has evidence against Stone "five different ways," but most of it, aside from the business with the bullets, is circumstantial.

- As far as William Watson being a "special guest star" is concerned, I think this is just a money/prestige issue which was negotiated by Watson's agent. Look at S02E02 where Martin Sheen plays a sleazy stockbroker. In that show, his character's girl friend is played by Collin Wilcox-Horne who gets the SGS treatment -- but was she more "famous" at the time (certainly not now, people would say "who the heck was that?")? I don't think so.


Added: August 23 2017 07:15:29 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Commitment is an excellent episode. Better than the Benjy one. Mostly because the focus here is our star Stone and he's been set up. Plus I always loved the Dedini reveal at the end. I remember when I first saw it I suspected Decker of being the bad guy, since he was a new character that we'd never seen before and we already saw Dedini before and he was the good guy. So that really threw me for a loop. I thought that was really cool and certainly not something you saw much of in the 70s. A recurring character would NEVER become the bad guy. That's something you expect in this day and age with serialized dramas (remember Nina or Logan on 24?) but not back in the day. It's cool to think that Dedini was dirty even in the Benjy episode, except that didn't come out at that particular time. Not until this story here. Very realistic!

Overall I'd still maintain that this is probably my second favorite season 2 episode, behind "For the Love of God". And much better than Shield of Honor or Karat Plague, both of which I enjoyed. In addition to Donner directing, the script is by my favorite Five 0 scribe John D.F. Black.

I agree that Denny Miller looks kinda fat in this episode. Like he ate a dozen donuts as a regular meal. Far from his lean and muscular Tarzan days! It's also surprising that he's relegated to the closing credits (same as in "Mask of Death", except there he was killed off very early in the show). And how does the "special guest star" thing work, especially on this show?? No way is William Watson more famous than William Smith or Denny Miller!! Then or now. Is it because he's a recurring character? But I've seen other instances on the show where they give the "special guest" billing to someone who's really not a special guest and not all that famous. Even back then. It's strange.

I really never had a problem with Stone being knocked out and framed for killing Carlino. The idea to clean Stone's gun and replace the bullet was a smart move since that's exactly what a cop would do if he were to murder someone using his gun (though preferably he wouldn't use his gun). As for the theory of Stone and Carlino struggling I can buy it. Did they really say that they found Stone unconscious? Maybe I missed something. I thought Stone came to on his own and called the cops. Which would mean his story of being knocked unconscious would be just that - HIS STORY. One question I had though was the bullet that Smith replaced. Something here doesn't make sense. What's shown is that he takes out a bullet from the chamber, cleans the chamber, then puts the bullet (same one or different one?) back in the chamber. But I thought the idea was to replace the bullet that was fired. Then why is he taking out a bullet? And did he have another spare bullet to put back in? An exact bullet for that particular gun? I'm not really a gun expert but I'm assuming Dedini told him exactly what kind of gun Stone uses so that Smith knew what type of replacement bullet he would need? Or do all cops carry the same gun?


Added: August 22 2017 06:20:37 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
SOSF S02E14: "Commitment" -- Review

http://www.thestreetsofsanfrancisco.info/sosf-2.htm#15


Added: August 21 2017 07:45:39 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Mike, I get what you're saying. It's true that "School of Fear" has a ridiculous premise but the overriding factor is how much enjoyment I get out of it. My "Winterkill" reaction comes merely from reading your review. But who knows? Maybe if I saw it I'd totally change my mind and find it really enjoyable. Even though the premise would still be pretty dumb in my mind. It's just that reading your synopsis I couldn't help but laugh about one geezer asking money from another geezer and because he's not getting that money the immediate next step is to plant bombs everywhere. LOL!! It's like me asking my boss for a raise and then because I'm not getting it I resort to booby trap his entire house with bombs. Sure I may get that raise but what then?? At what cost?? I don't think I'd be free long enough to enjoy that raise. Same thing with getting one old guy cataract surgery. I'm sure there are millions of people all over the county needing cataract surgery.

Five-O of course also had a senior citizen with a bomb episode and believe it or not it's actually my favorite from season 9. But it's all about the execution. The way Barnard Hughes played it and the fact that he wasn't really planning to go through with his threat (despite saying he would) and could easily turn it off with just one switch somehow makes it more believable and you really feel sorry for the old guy. There's also none of that cutesy-poo stuff there to distract - it's a serious issue. Plus the tension is really ratcheted up with the REAL bad guys (Mary Beth and George) when they take advantage of the situation. It all just works!!

Speaking of tearing down that house overnight in "Here Today" I don't know about you guys but sometimes while going to work I'll see a house going up and by the time I'm heading back home the house is near completion. It's amazing how quickly these guys work!! And that's to put up the house. I imagine to tear it down takes no time at all, in comparison.


Added: August 20 2017 03:11:02 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
I agree with Mr. Mike on "Winterkill". Good episode. The bombs all over the building is a stretch, but not too big of one. The old guy was fighting against being old. It is a good cause, especially as I get older. :)

I like Here Today -- Gone Tonight in spite of the lame bogus helicopter ride idea and the total destruction and clearing of a fairly full functioning house in one night.


Added: August 20 2017 09:18:57 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
The English 100 interpretation of Winterkill has already been suggested to me, but, instead, maybe this show should have been called Winterthreat, considering no one was actually killed. I find your comments that the episode has a "ridiculous premise" pretty interesting, Ringfire, especially considering I was using the same kind of anal-ytical logic with my thoughts on School of Fear. But then, if you watched Five-Zero, you would think I am nuts for giving S05E13 three and a half stars. To quote myself, in this show "[A] giant wrecking ball hits McGarrett's car and several terrorist types appear out of nowhere and kidnap Lange." This makes no sense at all, because how did the bad guys know that McGarrett and Joe White would be taking a particular road and would be at a certain location at exactly at a certain time, and how did they time the wrecking ball to hit the car with exactitude? (Hmmm, "exactitude," that sounds like a word Big Chicken would use, LOL.) As far as Winterkill is concerned, I thought the "cuteness" of the show overrode any illogic, sort of like the Sam Jaffe/Luther Adler episode from season 3, and, after all, I am "old," so I am partial to shows featuring "old folks." Let's face it, people have their favorites from various shows which make little sense at all -- for example, Here Today -- Gone Tonight and Deadly Courier. Some people even think that Classic Five-O's 12th season is really not so bad!

Added: August 20 2017 08:36:50 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Mr. Mike mentions that the titles for "Most Feared in the Jungle" and "Winterkill" are hard to understand. I agree about Winterkill, but Most Feared in the Jungle is easily understood. There was nothing more feared on the streets (jungle) than a new mother on the hunt, searching for her stolen new born baby. You can't mess with a mother over their baby!

Added: August 20 2017 08:08:01 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Winterkill is a deeper episode than most people realize. Tillman (Paul Fix) helped out his friends in the older age place when they needed things. Casey would be out of a place to stay without the money Tillman provided in the gas station robbery. Also, Tillman asked around the hospital about Casey's eye surgery. It was $10,000 and the doctor was sympathetic to his plight but it still needed to be done. I admire Armstrong earning his millions but what's $10,000 to a multi-millionaire?!They went back a long way Tillman & Armstrong. In each case, Tillman tried to find a solution and resorted to something criminal after he was thwarted. I don't agree with Tillman's hiding bombs and that kind of threat or violence. 3 stars for Winterkill. Mr Mike, I think Winterkill means Armstrong, Casey, Tillman these characters were in the last season of life The Winter season. Most were in their 70's or older. Most associate winter with cold and kind of a freeze death of life (flowers,trees etc) until spring. JC

Added: August 20 2017 03:35:32 AM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address



Comments:
Reading the review of "Winterkill" (which I have very little memory of) I can't help but laugh at the ridiculous premise. So you have this old geezer who goes to see his old buddy (who is now very rich) and asks him for some kind of a loan. This buddy who I'm guessing is a bit of a Scrooge refuses to give a loan. So what does the geezer do? He resorts to placing bombs all over this dude's buildings in order to force the dude to hand over some bread? Am I the only one thinking this is really ridiculous? It's even more so when you take into account the age of the perpetrator. So you've got like an 80 year old terrorist mad bomber? LOL!! And for what??? To get some money for some cataract surgery?? Gimme a break!! The writers were really stretching it with this one. And in the epilog these 2 geezers are pals again and bickering and nudging each other like 2 old coots?? Yeah, riiiiiiiight. Lol

If geezer 1 decides to blackmail geezer 2 in order to get the money I'm fine with that. But planting bombs all over town?? Umm, no. Not buying it. Did he expects the guy to fork over the money and then just forget about it? Despite the fact that this guy set bombs all over? Well, apparently that's exactly what happened, according to the review. Which only goes to show what a dumb script it is. I'm sure in the 70s planting bombs was considered a terrorist act same as today.


Added: August 19 2017 09:48:34 PM
Delete this entry Reply to entry View IP address
Powered by PHP Guestbook - brought to you by PHP Scripts
 
1 2 3 4 Next › Last »
Stop Guestbook SPAM