Hawaii Five-O Discussion Forum -- June 2016

The Hawaii Five-O Discussion Forum -- June 2016


The following are archived comments from June, 2016. After looking around, please add your own comments!

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Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

I forgot about lovely Elissa who I believe is now a realtor. As for Doug Mossman I actually thought he had passed away some time back.

I'm not familiar with Don Pomes. I think Lee Stetson was another stock actor who, while not as recognizable as Yankee Chang or Kwan Hi Lim or Galen Kam, I am more familiar with than Pomes. Not sure if he's still alive or not. He played Talbot's (Murray Matheson) henchman in "Why Wait Until Uncle Kevin Dies?" who set up all the so-called accidents. He also played James Ryan in "Up the Rebels" who gets gunned down in his apartment by Father Daniel Kostigan (Stephen Boyd) when he answers the doorbell. He was in a few other episodes as well.

I guess Melveen Leed (who apparently is the stepmother of Mark Dacascos) is still around but I'm not sure if she was on the show enough to qualify as a stock actress, the way Josie Over or Elissa Dulce were.

Added: Monday 13 June 2016 20:26:45 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Don Pomes, who appeared in six episodes of the original between 1977 and 1980, was in the second last show of the new series.

Helen Kuoha-Torco, whose hips were seen in the title of every episode of the old show (and whose face was seen in the pilot episode), was in the new show twice, once as a concerned mother and the second as a court reporter.

Elissa, who appeared in nine episodes of the original, was in one of last season's shows. She also auditioned for several other episodes of the reboot, but didn't get those jobs.

Doug Mossman, who was in 27 episodes of the old show, has been seen in the new one in a "don't blink too hard, or you will miss him" role.

Benjamin Jaus, who was in 3 episodes of the original, is still around; he is a friend of mine on Facebook.

Added: Monday 13 June 2016 09:09:38 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Thanks for that info, H50. Yeah I never heard of Multiply.

With the passing of Tommy Fujiwara and now Jimmy Borges I got to thinking that Terry Plunkett must be the last surviving member of the original stock company of local actors. If he's still alive, that is. He appeared a few years back in the Hookman remake but who knows if he's still around? Actually Lynne Ellen Hollinger also appeared recently on the new show. So that's 2 that I can think of that are still alive. Anyone else?

P.S. I'm not counting Al Harrington or Dennis Chun.

Added: Monday 13 June 2016 08:38:41 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Narrowed my never seen Classic HFO episodes list down some more...Watched the VD episode Chain Of Events & The Defector. Chain Of Events more interesting than I thought. The Health Dept worker Kalima & the young girl were both killed in a short span of time. HFO spends the episode tracking down contacts with VD. It leads to some interesting people and finally to Warren. The campaign for Senator Warren was authentic with eager workers and staff and political signage. Warren appears to be the killer but there's a nice twist ending. I'd give Chain Of Events 4 stars.
The Defector was a powerhouse episode. It starts with a singular man on a raft arriving on Oahu. He is suddenly met by another man. The Defector shoots this man and then grazes himself. Ormsbee a genius scientist conducting experiments knows The Defector Lee and they are good friends. McG visits Ormsbee on his ship with some excellent sparring. Pat Hingle's acting is outstanding and Ormsbee comes across as arrogant and gruff but an incredibly intelligent man. Ormsbee acts as a mediator hoping to get The Defector Lee political asylum here but McG has to investigate that Lee murdered someone. McG finally agrees to Ormsbee's points and meet Lee. A hitman on a motorcycle tries to assassinate Lee at the rendezvous point but the killer misses on purpose. The episode turns when McG realizes the Lee character has no fingerprints on file. McG and Ormsbee talk about Lee and his possibility of being a fake an imposter. The fake Lee fails Ormsbee's 1962 SF Giants-Yankees World Series test. An excellent ending at the ship testing site and Ormsbee's coolness going through with McG's plan places The Defector as a top HFO episode. I give The Defector 5 stars out of 6. John

Added: Monday 13 June 2016 01:43:08 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Ringfire, Multiply was a social network. It was outstanding in that it encouraged friendships by allowing members to design their own pages and to post their writing, photography, or other interests.

Facebook isn't even in the same league, where you get to post only a banner and profile photo and there are no options to change typestyle, sizes, etc. Emphasis seems to be on garnering large numbers of "friends" rather than getting to know them as people, as we did on Multiply.

But the Multiply operators decided to move away from social networking and to selling goods online; e.g., Amazon, Etsy, et al. Most of their business came from Indonesia, and so they moved in that direction.

I have Facebook friends whom I've known since Yahoo 360 days, then on Multiply, now on Facebook. For 10 years. One, in particular, I watched her daughter grow up. Becky was 12 years old when I met her mother on Y360. Now, she's 22 and studying in university. They feel like next-door neighbors, even though they live across the pond. That isn't happening with people I meet on FB, where it's not much more than hi and bye.

Added: Saturday 11 June 2016 05:24:22 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Fred, thanks. Season 8 is of course another fine season but it's not quite the show at its peak. That would be seasons 1-6. It's a bit difficult to rank seasons 7-9. They're not quite as strong as 1-6 but they're leaps and bounds ahead of 10-12. I think I used to prefer 9 over both 7 and 8, but now I think they're about even. Actually in some ways maybe I even have a slight preference for 7 over the other two because Ben is still there (for at least the first half of the season) and we still have the producing team of Bob Sweeney and William Finnegan from the previous seasons. Plus "I'll Kill 'Em Again" is just an absolute classic!

H50 1.0 FOREVER, thanks for the explanation of the 12 principles of photography. Very interesting. Next time I watch "Unmarked Grave" I will be keeping my eyes open to see if I can spot any of these 12. Hopefully it won't be too difficult to notice. But what is a "Multiply friend"???

John, as disturbed as Brad Stevens was in "Deadly Persuasion" he seemed pretty intelligent so I have to assume that somehow he managed to find out where those toxins are stored in that building and how to get inside. As for walking across that crane that doesn't really bother me. Provided you're not terrified of heights and/or you don't look down then pretty much anyone can do it. He's not the best of the Five-O psychos for sure but I think his plan and motivation really make the episode gripping.

Added: Friday 10 June 2016 22:05:14 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Speaking of Season 8, I watched Deadly Persuasion again with Stevens and his escapades. It's an episode that has produced some good and bad reviews on the forum. Also, Deadly Persuasion fits the believability or non believability discussion this week. I think what strikes me early is how does this Stevens know where this liquid nerve gas is hidden and stored. He's a college student maybe 20. It also takes a Skywalker's skill to navigate the crane like rig thing seen later in The Skyline Killer. Stevens is an intelligent and detailed planner making Danno move from place to place. The killing of a Danno informant Oakley who he blames for the later suicide of his father is in his mind justified. Also, setting up Danno for Oakley's killing by stealing Danno's gun justified in his mind too. Circumstantial Evidence is a theme but Danno remembers that there was plenty of evidence that Stevens was a dirty cop. The chance meeting of Danno talking with Stevens in a Psych CRMJ class a few days before breaks the mystery of the perpetrator. Danno has to clear his name of Oakley's murder but also find Stevens who will use the nerve gas on the visiting Royal Family. Stevens loses his resolve as the HFO team and HPD swarm the building. McG expresses that he's surrounded and the Royal Family in Maui. A fake Royal Family is who he witnessed. Danno takes a dangerous tactic of telling Stevens about his Dad who had committed suicide and was a cop. He was indeed a dirty cop and states he couldn't face his son. Suicide was his way out. I would give Deadly Persuasion 3.5 out of 6 stars. For a friend, Manicote sure is eager to prosecute HFO members whether it is McG or Danno over the years. I think Stevens was an intelligent criminal but the added psychology component was not needed. Deadly Persuasion would have been a better episode if his Dad was currently on trial for illegalities and corruption. Stevens would sneak into the Evidence Locker like Duggan in Death With Father and steal any incriminating evidence on his Dad. This would be more plausible since his Dad on the force and Stevens probably would know the station like the back of his hand. What did you like/dislike about Deadly Persuasion? John

Added: Friday 10 June 2016 18:19:38 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Ringfire, here are the 12 principles of photography:

-- Rule of Thirds - Divide the screen in a grid of nine blocks (3x3). Let's say you're photographing the ocean from Diamond Head Road. In the upper third, you have the sky. In the center third, you have the oceans with its gradations of blue. In the lower third, you have the grasses, trees, and rock wall.

-- Framing - Let's say a tree is growing on one side of your picture of the ocean. Its branches cascade over the view.

-- Leading lines - Instead of walking up to your subject and taking a close-up, stand back and let the sidewalk lead the viewer's eye up to the subject.

-- Viewpoint - Deciding on your vantage point. Do you want to show the subject from on high, from below, at an angle...?

-- Symmetry and Patterns - Showing the bricks in a brick wall or the cluster of tiny branches that radiate out from the main trunk and branches of a tree, for example

-- Depth - Create depth by having objects in the foreground, mid-ground, and background.

-- Texture - Photographer Baz writes, "Texture is a good idea when you're taking pictures of rocks, walls, surfaces, someone’s hands, or leaves. In order to make a picture reveal a texture, you must make sure the light is coming almost exactly from the side of the surface so it creates shadows in key places."

-- Background - Use the aperture (focus) to blur the background so that the subject becomes dominant.

-- Balancing Elements - Using the Rule of Thirds, you place your subject in one of the corner axies. That leaves a void in the rest of the picture, so you add an element to add balance to the off-center subject. For example, going back to Diamond Head Road, pick up a corner of the rock fence to add depth and balance to the scene of the ocean framed by the tree branches.

-- Filling the Frame - If you want a picture of Kamehameha's face, close in on his face and let the Ali'iolani Hale fade into the background. With a point-and-shoot camera (pocket digital), move closer. With a DSLR, adjust your aperture.

-- Color - Baz writes, "Colours, more than any other design element, determine the emotional content of a photograph. You can establish the entire mood of a shot by emphasizing a particular color scheme: Reds and oranges are hot and exciting, ready to burn at the touch. Blues and greens are cool and refreshing, the deep running of a mountain stream or the freshness of new-mown lawn. Yellows warm us, from the buttery glow of morning sunlight to the romantic amber of candlelight."
But don't forget that black-and-white can be highly effective, too, if color isn't necessary to the picture.

-- Simplifying - Baz writes, "Paring your compositions down to their bare bones begins as a mental process. Try to describe in a single sentence what it is you're photographing: 'This is a photograph of a lighthouse at sunset.' Then begin to eliminate all but the essential visual elements. Do you need the kids on the sandbar in the foreground to make the picture? Or the boat dock in the background?" Change your angle and focus to remove unnecessary objects from your picture.

Hope this helps.

P.S. Baz was a Multiply friend, who took fantastic photographs and took the time to teach us one rule each week for twelve weeks. I kept his notes and have used them often.

Added: Friday 10 June 2016 11:40:49 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Ringfire: Your choices for Season 8 are very good. Season 8 was good, but not near the top for the series. But discussion shows there are still plenty of great episodes in the season.

Added: Friday 10 June 2016 09:40:13 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Rainbow and Rick, thanks for the support bruddahs!!

Fred, it's all good. Water under the bridge.

H50 1.0 FOREVER, what are the 12 principles of photography that you mentioned concerning "Honor is an Unmarked Grave"?

My top 5 for 8:

1. McGarrett is Missing - B. Bilson
2. Deadly Persuasion - A. Reisner
3. The Capsule Kidnapping - B. McEveety
4. Retire in Sunny Hawaii Forever - B. Bilson
5. This one is tough to fill - used to be The Case Against McGarrett, but these days it could be Death's Name is SAM or Turkey Shoot at Makapuu or Legacy of Terror or Sing a Song of Suspense.

Added: Friday 10 June 2016 07:30:32 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Yes. The conclusion was satisfactory, but only because of the last few sentences. McGarrett and CDR Blackwell agreed that they would have to see what the governor said about the commander and Tahashi failing to report the gold and using it to fund Japanese-American causes. McGarrett said that, if the governor did not approve, then he would go after the commander. McGarrett stuck to the letter of the law, even though he agreed that the gold had been used for good causes.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 18:52:10 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

John Chergi:

I like "Legacy of Terror" as it was. The ending was terrific. Greed went out the door and humanitarianism wins out for a change.

Ringfire: I apologize for overreacting. I can get too sensitive.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 16:03:38 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

I have to agree with Fred, Rainbow & others. Season 8 Classic HFO was a strong season. Had a difficult time choosing 5 so I added 1 more for 6. MY FAVS Season 8. 1.Death's Name is SAM 2.Legacy Of Terror 3.A Killer Grows Wings 4.Retire In Sunny Hawaii...Forever 5.The Case Against McGarrett 6.Murder--Eyes Only. I'm a big fan of the plantation episodes A Killer Grows Wings & A Stranger In His Grave. Murder--Eyes Only was in the Top 3 but I have some questions on the clinic and some of the psychological stuff. It is a very visual pleasing episode with the ships and flowers. Bissell and her father were not likable characters. Touch Of Guilt was a powerful episode. Shows how excellent Season 8 is...I did not have it in the top 6. Have to watch the Ornsbee episode and a few others. I also was impressed by the storm in McGarrett Is Missing. Realistic with the thunder and lightning. CLASSIC HFO QUESTION OF THE DAY: Do you think in Legacy Of Terror that a better ending would have McG finding the whole treasure chest of gold at the cabin? Or would you have left it a mystery the story of the gold? Was the scholarships and the Senior Center funded by the gold satisfactory ending to you? John

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 15:06:27 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

I agree with Rainbow.

I enjoy ring's in depth analysis. I don't see anything derogatory in his posts ...ever.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 14:32:03 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Okay. I'll add two honorable mentions:

* "A Killer Grows Wings" (I like the interplay between McGarrett and Kate Holbrook. He's going to write her up because her horse doesn't have a license plate. ROFL)
* "McGarrett is Missing" (I like every episode in which Charles Cioffi appears)

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 14:15:25 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Good choices H50 1.0 FOREVER for Season 8. As long as you went out to 8 places, I'll add my 6-8.

6 - Legacy of Terror (Gidget's father, Don Porter, makes for a great bad guy for the 2nd time, plus you get Mako.)
7 - Wooden Model of a Rat
8 - Anatomy of a Bribe

And honorable mention to "McGarrett is Missing", "A Killer Grows Wings", "Target? The Lady", "The Defector" and "How to Steal a Submarine".

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 10:01:30 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

My 8 favorites from Season 8:

-- "Murder - Eyes Only" (love the ships and the highline, but could do without the whining, self-righteous Marcia Bissell)
-- "Termination With Extreme Prejudice" (The "glad hands across the sea" storyline is very true to life. I saw it in DC)
-- "Death's Name is Sam" (Well crafted all around. Especially like George Takei's performance)
-- "The Defector" (Also well crafted. All three Ormsbee episodes are favorites of mine)
-- "Sing a Song of Suspense" (Good acting by everyone in this one. Very well cast)
-- "Honor is an Unmarked Grave" (Eileen Heckart's performance was terrific. Jack's direction incorporating the 12 principles of photography was outstanding; very artistic throughout)
-- "Wooden Model of a Rat" (Fine acting all around. Ed Asner as a far different character than Lou Grant. Kwan Hi Lim's deadpan responses to Ed Asner are fantastic!)
-- "Loose Ends Get Hit" (The three Mercurys in the car chase scene can't be beat. The McGarrett / Sandi interaction is tops. As usual, Henry Darrow gives a fine performance.)

Season 8 was excellent. Doesn't receive near the accolades that it should.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 08:37:08 MST


Submitted by: John
From: Maine

Interesting subject matter the last two days here. Gets me thinking which side of the "believability" (is this a word, can't seem to think of how to spell it?) fence I stand on.

I guess I don't mind hard to believe plots as long as the quality is good, in other words what really makes my opinion of an episode go south is when believeability is compromised by sloppy writing or even intentionally compromised due to professional laziness or cost cutting.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 09:01:49 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Ringfire:

You didn't do anything wrong. You were making an analysis which was thoughtful and I and many others used to make about movies in the 1980's about how films were made. I would say more but don't have the time.

No need to apologize.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 07:48:39 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Ringfire: No further comment.

Regarding Season 8, my 5 favorites are:

1 - Retire in Sunny Hawaii - Forever
2 - Turkey Shoot at Makapuu
3 - Termination With Extreme Prejudice
4 - Loose Ends Get Hit
5 - Sing a Song of Suspense

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 07:41:06 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Now hold it right there, Fred. I have no clue how you jumped to the conclusion that my comments were derogatory towards you. I feel that I should be offended now. You won't find a single derogatory remark towards you in my post. Because I placed you in one camp and myself in the other that's derogatory? Makes no sense. Maybe you belong in both camps, maybe neither, I don't know. Doesn't make a difference really. If anything I appreciated your comment on "Killer Bee" because it got me thinking how differently we view episodes. Hence why I even responded. For instance you couldn't believe that George could have that kind of control over Ted, hence the episode didn't work for you. Whereas I tend to just go with it, so having accepted that George COULD have that kind of control over Ted I found it fascinating. That's all I was saying. Some people look at how believable a situation is while others look at how entertaining it is. So I'm in the second camp. As for you? I don't know. Sorry man, I wasn't trying to wall you up in some prison camp. This is all hypothetical stuff. You can give "Killer Bee" zero stars and that's fine by me. Like I said I appreciated you earlier comment but not the most recent one. That came out of nowhere. Seriously.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 07:07:23 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Ringfire:

I don't like an episode you like so you post a derogatory comment about me on this forum? Or maybe you don't consider labeling someone you don't know as derogatory. Perhaps you would call it bullying? You like "Killer Bee". Great. I'm mature enough to know that everyone doesn't think like me. Look at the 3 comments in my last two posts where I mention your name. All complimentary. I didn't unfairly label you as something. I like entertaining episodes as much as everyone else. But if it makes you feel better, I don't find "Killer Bee" entertaining.

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 06:15:14 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Ringfire
I really don't have a problem with the psychological type episodes. It's when Cal in Force Of Waves acts out of character or Maynard the top inspector in Anatomy Of A Bribe suddenly changes that bothers me. Many of the Classic HFO episodes like Journey Out Of Limbo and A Shallow Grave with a psychological dynamic...I have enjoyed watching thoroughly. Deadly Persuasion was an intelligent episode but there were problems such as:How would the college kid know about the deadly nerve gas? Where it would be stored? How to handle it with such care and confidence? etc. Killer Bee is a very depressing episode. I seldom watch it or The Box. It makes me cringe seeing McG getting punched and the angry words thrown at him. I think many Classic HFO fans have a few personal FAVS that are underrated. 6,000 Deadly Tickets, Death's Name Is Sam, and Assault On The Palace are a few of mine. John

Added: Wednesday 09 June 2016 01:50:59 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

I see that Fred mentions that he doesn't care for "Killer Bee" because he doesn't find it believable. This got me thinking that basically Five-O fans fall into 2 camps - those who judge an episode by how believable it is and those who judge it by how entertaining it is. Fred seems to fall into the first camp. I'm definitely in the second. Most of my favorite episodes aren't all that believable. How many killers do we know that have hooks for hands, for instance? Or think of all those psycho episodes - how often do we hear about someone recreating past crimes or killing and then taunting the cops about it? Not too many. Actually none that I can think of. But it seemed to happen on Five-O with quite a bit of regularity. Which totally works for me because at the end of the day it's fiction, it's entertainment. Often times the more bizarre, the more entertaining. I don't need every episode to be about "real" crimes like fraud or embezzlement or robbery or drugs. I enjoyed the more unique and "out there" stories - something that Five-O did EXCEPTIONALLY well! Better than other shows of the time. I don't mind believeability but I judge an episode by how entertaining and fascinating it was for me. That's why episodes like "Killer Bee" or "One for the Money" or "Rest in Peace, Somebody" always hit that sweet spot for me.

John, "The Case Against McGarrett" is quite good but I always feel like it could have been a lot more. It certainly can't hold up to the original Vashon trilogy. Sometimes I even wonder if it makes my top 5 for season 8. Sometimes it does and then sometimes it doesn't. For instance I easily prefer "Deadly Persuasion" which for some odd reason doesn't get much love around here. It, along with "McGarrett is Missing" is my favorite from season 8. Then there's also "Retire in Sunny Hawaii" and "The Capsule Kidnapping". Both great episodes too!

Added: Wednesday 08 June 2016 21:32:34 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

John Chergi: Good stuff "Streets". Episodes mentioned are very good. And that Joe Don Baker episode is creepy. Very scary. Most of the first season has great episodes.

"The Case Against McGarrett" is an okay episode. You can feel Vashon's vengeance. But I have major problems with the plot. I just refuse to believe that the inmates will sit still for the farce of a trial when they had other things to consider, like breaking out or negotiating something to make the whole scheme of luring in McGarrett worth it. I would give it 2 stars, leaning lower rather than higher.

Added: Wednesday 08 June 2016 17:44:41 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Great Classic HFO discussion by the site regulars this week. I found some scenes that I missed before in some Classic episodes. For example, The Two-Faced Corpse. A young maid type summons Mrs. Crystal after McG arrives to talk with her. I missed that for some reason. I usually see McG talking to Crystal right away. Similar to Force Of Waves. McG slyly puts the ticket on the workbench. There are numbers on the ticket. Don't remember seeing numbers that visible before.
On Streets Of San Francisco: Keller & Stone make a good team. I think HFO had better written stories. Some standout episodes were: Police Buff with Bill Bixby. I also enjoyed Mask Of Death with John Davidson. Might be the best episode on entire show. The Glass Dart Board with the sniper going around SF shooting places. That PERT chart makes me laugh every time. Stone becomes exasperated with the guy in charge. Hatch season was very good. There's also an intriguing episode Spooks For Sale with a young Tom Selleck. The only thing that bothered me was the way Stone kissed his 20 something college daughter Jeanie on the mouth. Sometimes, 2 or 3 times an episode. It just seemed strange to me. One of my FAV Streets Of San Francisco episodes featured Joe Don Baker. He's a recent ex-con who plays a harmonica. He kills Jeanie's friend then goes after Jeanie. It's payback for Stone putting him in prison. Classic HFO Question Of The Day:On a Four star system, how would you grade The Case Against McGarrett? John

Added: Wednesday 08 June 2016 15:32:57 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Mr. Mike: Good luck with Kojak. I never could get into the "baby" stuff back in the day. I may look into watching it though.

I remember my parents enjoying Mannix. I think I remember there being some discussion about Peggy Fisher as Mannix's secretary. That was unusual for television back in the racially charged 60's. I tried to watch some of the episodes to see if they were interesting enough to buy, but no major streamer (Netflix, Amazon Prime) seems to have it in their library.

And I agree with Ringfire about The Streets of San Francisco". I raised this before. It's about as good as H5O. The major drawback is that it's only 5 seasons. Ringfire brings up all the relevant pluses about the show. Good plots, good locale and good music. Cable cars, Alcatraz, Chinatown, Fisherman's Wharf, Nob Hill, Telegraph Hill, North Beach, Golden Gate Bridge and Candlestick Park are some of the famous locales featured. And I get the feeling that some of the music plays off from "Dirty Harry" (also based in San Francisco). I think that Michael Douglas is awesome as the learning prodigy to the competent father figure of Karl Malden. And a good deal of the shows guest stars were also on 5-O. It's like having the family over. Mike, I love it when Malden calls Douglas "Buddy Boy". It shows warmth and caring. The 5th season with Richard Hatch is still good, but Douglas was far and away the better partner to Malden.

Added: Wednesday 08 June 2016 11:58:35 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Episodes of Topic: "Force of Waves", "Killer Bee", "Anatomy of a Bribe" & "Shake Hands With The Man On The Moon".

I'm not the kind to get into the psycho episodes. "Forces of Waves" is okay, but for me, I lose interest in the plot. It's just not an interesting episode. Although, Ringfire raises excellent arguments in favor of the episode. I think Mike's revised rating is fair.

"Waves" is far better than "Killer Bee". I can't buy into the control that Loomis has over Frazier. But I give Five-O credit for highlighting PTSD, as it wasn't as generally accepted/acknowledged at the time.

Another unfavorable psycho episode for me is the Richard Hatch episode, "Study in Rage". Part of that is Hatch's acting, but the painting of subject's minds seems silly and then made worse by McGarrett trying to figure the painting out. It just doesn't do it for me. I did like Rockford File semi regular Gretchen Corbett though.

"Man on the Moon" is good. Lots of shadiness by real estate guys trying to dupe the public and long time Polynesian land owners. A slight resemblance to "Paniolo". I think the man on the moon syndrome of "what's left in life to do now" is valid enough. Nice historic info on the boat Ringfire.

"Anatomy of a Bribe" was one of those episodes that didn't get played out here in syndication. The first time I saw it on DVD, I really enjoyed it. Still do. I'm sure bribing is a major dealing in a lot of business transactions and probably more so in construction. The episode does a nice job bringing that to light. I think the building fire idea was probably from "The Towering Inferno" from a couple years before.

Nice classic episode conversations.

Added: Wednesday 08 June 2016 11:25:15 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Lenkov's MacGyver reboot is in list of "most promising new shows"?!?

http://uproxx.com/tv/most-least-promising-shows-2016-ad-buyers/2/

Added: Wednesday 08 June 2016 08:45:59 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

I don't have any issues with the psychiatric mumbo-jumbo in either "Force of Waves" or "Killer Bee". Overall I prefer "Killer Bee" - I find the villain (played by David Arkin) to be particularly creepy and the entire episode pretty disturbing. You can't help but feel sorry for poor Jeff. Oh, and that mother. Sheesh! She could give Norman Bates' mother a run for the money.

I've only seen about two or three KOJAK episodes here and there (I recall one with Sylvester Stallone and another with John P. Ryan playing a real psycho creep stalking Kojak and his family) but I never really got into the show. Maybe I just haven't seen enough episodes. Overall I prefer STREETS OF SAN FRANCISCO (which feels similar yet somehow is more interesting to me). The best thing about KOJAK is of course Savalas - the man is a joy to watch. He IS the show! To hear him talk and hearing all those Kojak-isms that he uses is music to the ears. I can see why he won an Emmy for the role - deservedly so. Between him and Karl Malden I gotta go with Savalas. But I just find the stories on STREETS to be more interesting (of course I've seen more of that show so maybe it's a bit unfair). I also prefer the San Fran locales to those of the Big Apple. And the funky theme song by Patrick Williams!

Added: Tuesday 07 June 2016 19:49:28 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Good comments on Force Of Waves by Mr. Mike, Ringfire, and others. I have also downgraded Force Of Waves to 4 stars on my 6 star system. They could have rewritten the script with Fairbourne as the killer. He conspired with somebody to blow up the boat. He wanted Mrs. Sloan for himself. Cal was such a helpful and kind person. He just should not have been the perpetrator in the Mr. Sloan murder. I think that was why the writers gave Cal this 2 personality thing. It would have been a poor reflection on Steve to have a friend blowing up boats. I also didn't like how McG provoked Cal inside the boat. The psychologist warned Steve that could send Cal over the edge or a number of other things. McG had that bad arm as well. He's lucky Cal didn't kill him too. That explosion scene was well-done. McG blasted into the water and Cal jumping into to save him from drowning and his injuries.
Mr. Mike, I think Kojak can be a polarizing figure. Some of the episodes were quite creative. I'm a Joan Van Ark fan. Loved the episode when she worked with Kojak. The episode ended in the cemetery on a wintery day. Kojak had a meaner streak to him than McG and would color outside the lines to catch a criminal. I don't think McG would have associated with the types of people Kojak did. Crocker & Danno are comparable but I like Danny Williams better. Kojak was a larger than life character. It would have been interesting what a crossover episode with McGarrett and Kojak looked like. That would be one hell of an episode. John

Added: Tuesday 07 June 2016 19:27:58 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Being somewhat disappointed by Mannix, I have switched my binge-watching to Kojak.

The first seasons of Kojak were scored by Cacavas (much better than anything I heard from him on Five-O, where he didn't seem to "fit in" with the style of the resident composers like Stevens and Ray). Kojak's main theme and end credit music were originally done by Billy Goldenberg. Note the end credit theme here is an abbreviated version, sort of like on Five-Zero.

But the last (fifth) season was completely done by Cacavas, including a new main theme (which is about one minute long under a collage of Savalas images) as well as new end credit music. These themes are very funky in keeping with the times, sounding like Charlie's Angels.

Cacavas' underscore for the show itself in the fifth season is also very different, as if they suddenly got a much higher music budget or something. It sounds like it's done by a completely different composer compared to his music in seasons two and three which are the only ones I have binge-watched so far.

Aside from Cacavas music, which is really jarring compared to what I have heard so far, the fifth season seems to have fallen into a routine, but it's still pretty good from the first 4 shows I have seen. In the first show, Kojak has to figure out how to get an undercover operative (a woman) to help him convict a crook without compromising a federal investigation into the Mob boss she is friendly with (Charles Cioffi, in a rather bad performance). The second fifth season show has this psycho going after some new-age woman radio host; I found her personality and constant efforts to stymie Kojak's help to track her stalker to be extremely annoying. The third show deals with a cop who has been taken off the force because of budgetary considerations who ends up working with various criminal types and whose wife is suffering from mental problems. The fourth show deals with underage kids being recruited to do things like deal drugs and get involved with other crimes all the way up to and including first-degree murder.

Whether you like Kojak or not will largely depend on how you feel about Savalas (a female friend of mine thinks he is creepy), who is front and center in almost all the shows. His Kojak is sometimes very overbearing and bossy towards the other men in the police station and he often yells a lot, especially at criminals. He is also a major ladies' man. (There was one exchange which I can't go back and trace where he told this lawyer of some sleazeball client that he (the lawyer) was lower than dirt (even I was surprised by how vitriolic this comment was).

Added: Tuesday 07 June 2016 15:46:10 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

The MacGyverisms were reportedly grounded in scientific fact (like the business about chocolate bars stopping sulphuric acid). But the writers would reportedly leave out certain things in the middle of the procedure to prevent people from "trying this at home" and resulting in serious injury or death. There was at least one case where some kid fatally created a bomb using household products as demonstrated in the show which ended up in court (do a Google search for "macgyver lawsuit explosion" without the quotes).

I did downgrade Force of Waves, but will have to think about this. The psychiatric mumbo-jumbo is what annoyed me this time around. What other shows than Killer Bee have this kind of plot twist, by the way?

One thing I liked about Force of Waves was how Danno was harassing the suspected wife, even when her sleazy lawyer was in the room, and of course she started blabbing away despite the lawyer's cautions. Shades of Five-Zero, though on the new show a lawyer wouldn't have been present and wouldn't even have shown up! I don't think this kind of harassment happened too much on the old show, though.

Added: Tuesday 07 June 2016 08:58:47 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Mike,

MacGYVER is one of those 80s shows, like KNIGHT RIDER, which seems like it was mostly geared for kids and which was a blast to watch when you were a kid but then not so much once you grew up. I didn't watch MacGYVER as a kid so I don't have that connection to it, but I recall that when I first saw KNIGHT RIDER as a 10-year-old I thought it was the coolest thing ever! But as my taste buds matured I began to see it as a pretty cheesy show. Now, I can still watch it but mostly due to nostalgia. If it weren't for nostalgia and I had just seen the show for the first time today who knows what I would think of it? I'm sure it's the same with MacGYVER. I know lots of kids I went to school with who talked about it a lot. I know some kids who were really into science who loved the show because MacGyver was some sort of role model for them, what with his preference to use his brains and science over violence. Some of the things that Mac came up with were pretty cool while some seemed pretty far-fetched. I think MYTHBUSTERS proved that many of those MacGyverisms actually worked. I think a number of the episodes from season 1 were pretty good and are worth checking out - The Heist, Last Stand, Deathlock, Countdown, The Assassin. There's also a really bizarre episode about killer ants in the Amazon in "Trumbo's World" - I'd love to hear what you think of that one. ;)

The 2 and a half stars for "Force of Waves" - is that what you had before or did you downgrade the episode? Someone said that Cal Anderson's schizophrenia hurt the episode but personally I think that's what makes it a standout episode. It begins as just another standard episode where it appears that money and/or a bad marriage may have been the cause of the murder. Could be a plot for a typical MANNIX episode too. We've seen plenty of episodes like this. But then we're thrown this curve-ball where the murder has nothing to do with the victim's wife or lawyer or ex-wife or anyone connected to his money or his will or his marriage. The killer ends up being a total schizo who doesn't even know that he killed someone. Yes, it's pretty bizarre but that's what makes it interesting.

Added: Monday 06 June 2016 23:20:59 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

John, "Shake Hands With the Man on the Moon" has a great deal going for it. It is based on the mental depression suffered by several astronauts, including Buzz Aldrin, upon returning to earth. Although no official cause for the depression has been established, it seems likely to be related to finding something meaningful to do after you've been to the moon and back. Let's face it: That's a tough act to follow.

It is good to see McGarrett leave himself out of his plea to CDR Royce not to ruin his life by killing Devlin. McGarrett, too, graduated from the USNA. McGarrett, too, achieved the rank of commander. But he did not throw those things up to Royce. Instead, he used Royce's own accomplishments to build him up. That is a sense of humility that we don't see very often.

And, then, there was the meeting aboard the Falls of Clyde, the tall ship on which McGarrett met with another former astronaut, Stan Richmond (Bob Sevey). The old barque didn't show as well in "Shake Hands..." as she did in "Small Potatoes," also in Season 10. Then, she really shone.

Since then, Falls of Clyde has been failing. The Bishop Museum, which owned her, wanted to take her out and scuttle her, but the Friends of the Falls of Clyde stepped in and purchased her. Now, efforts are seemingly overwhelming to raise needed funds to move her out of Honolulu Harbor and restore her. Efforts are being made to secure grant money for the project. Read more about her at http://www.friendsoffallsofclyde.org/. It would be a shame to lose this last metal tall ship / barque. Frankly, I think Matson should step in and help to save the ship which served them for so many years, but that's only my opinion.

Added: Monday 06 June 2016 18:42:37 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

I decided to watch 2 more episodes of Classic HFO that I missed in syndication. The 1st Anatomy of a Bribe focused around the horrible fire at the Globe Trade Center and the substandard materials used to construct it. HFO look for the inspector Kimura who signed off on the job but Maynard a smug and arrogant head of inspectors decides to kill Kimura first. He makes it appear Kimura was despondent after the Globe Trade Center fire and drank himself to sadness and committed suicide. Jumping off the building of the work site. McG sees through the charade quickly the low BAC of Kimura and the forgery of Kimura's signature. Maynard is an intelligent and cunning criminal even walking into HFO office about an entrapment. I would give this episode 3.5 stars out of 6. Shake Hands With The Man On The Moon was a fascinating episode. I really loved it. Devlin plays the sleazy land developer who orders the hit on an investigative journalist. This man building a case on Devlin is blown up at a restaurant bar. Devlin uses a respected ex-astronaut Commander Royce to legitimize his new venture. Royce puts on his space helmet and shakes hands with people interested in investing. McG talks with Devlin but has no evidence linking him to the murdered investigative journalist. Royce builds a friendship with an old rancher who's land Devlin wishes to purchase. The old man is stubborn and refuses to sell. While riding horses on the ranch, Devlin's hit men kill the old man as he is affixed to the horse to run freely. Royce recognizes the car leaving as one from Devlin's place. The Commander has a tape recorder and blackmails Devlin in getting him more $ and position in the company. Royce becomes a loose end who knows too much. His two-faced girlfriend saves his life from the hitmen and Royce stops at Devlin's to kill him. HFO arrives and McG is able to talk Royce out of shooting Devlin. Just an amazing episode! I give it 4.5 stars out of 6. John

Added: Monday 06 June 2016 17:45:33 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

In anticipation of Lenkov's reboot of MacGyver which is not only coming next fall, but will reportedly be a lead-in at 8 p.m. to Five-Zero at 9 p.m. on Friday nights (a cross-over is all but guaranteed), I got the first season of MacGyver out of the library.

This show, which I had never seen before, was not my cup of tea at all. I thought the show was filmed in Vancouver, but only seasons 3-6 were. I have season three on order, but I doubt if I would change my opinion about it after watching the first couple of season one shows.

Based on watching these two shows, I agree with much of this posting:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088559/board/thread/224584231

Both of these shows had "Asian" connections.

In the first one, MacGyver rescues a military pilot who has been shot down and has landed on top of a rock formation which looks like it is in the Grand Canyon. There are some interesting stunts at the beginning. The bulk of this show concerns how MacGyver rescues these two scientists who have been trapped in an underground explosion in a top-secret laboratory. One of these guys is Paul Stewart, who was Willard Lennox in Five-O's episode 10,000 Diamonds and a Heart (his last role before he died). Some of the MacGyverisms in this show were preposterous, i.e., chocolate bars can stop sulphuric acid which is leaking from a tank. The only thing that gave me a laugh was when MacGyver is going down into the underground lab with this blonde babe above him on a ladder. She is wearing a dress, but the virginal MacGyver does not look up, or he would see her underpants!! :!devil:

The second show takes MacGyver to Burma where he has to retrieve a poison-filled canister from a crash site (another military airplane crash as in the first show, another "Asian" location). While there, a drug lord mistakes MacGyver for a narcotics agent. Despite the show being in Burma, all the people speak English very well. There are some well known Asian character actors in this show like Keye Luke, Clyde Kusatsu, Joan Chen, George Cheung, etc. A kid among the locals who are being forced as slaves by the bad guys to pick opium poppies escapes into the jungle, where he befriends MacGyver, who is hiding out. MacGyver then helps out the locals overcome the evil drug lords.

There is also a kid in the first episode who shoots basketballs in MacGyver's place which seems to be inside the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles.

I am still still tempted to review Lenkov's reboot, which looks atrocious based on the trailer. This show has caused a huge stink in the IMDB discussion group for the old MacGyver show (sound familiar?).

Added: Sunday 05 June 2016 09:00:23 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Yes, John. The purple Triumph Spitfire was a winner in that episode. The racing stripe really makes it.

Added: Saturday 04 June 2016 03:31:51 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

I have 12-15 episodes that I've never watched in Classic HFO. Yesterday, I watched one of those that I never saw before Ready...Aim... A Season 9 Episode I believe. It was an episode Mr. Mike awarded with 2 stars on his 4 star system. That's a spot on review. I like how the episode begins in Tokyo with Nahashi a Japanese cop & his partner staking out a place. They begin to follow a man with a suitcase. A fire fight ensues with Nahashi's partner being shot up high in the chest and killed. Some of the handguns spill out. Nahashi has a female contact Iso who gives him information on the Hawaii gun smuggling ring which is funneling guns to Japan. However, Iso has been forced to double-cross Nahashi as the criminal enterprise have kidnapped her young daughter. There is a cool chase scene with Robert the Hit Man played brilliantly by Jimmy Borges. He drives a purple sports car and I just love the car and the scene. Nahashi receives some shots at his car but suffers a head concussion. McG enters the hospital to talk with Nahashi but he escapes. McG & HFO team track down Nahashi through Iso and realize both of their handgun investigations intersect. Ready...Aim...is a good episode but not a Classic like Hookman or the Vashon episodes. Almos plays a POS crook The Dancer who travels to Hawaii to see Iso lead Nahashi to them and to his death. Robert the Hit Man escapes the HFO & HPD dragnet at the temple with Nahashi as bait and is later killed by The Dancer as a loose end. The Dancer makes his mistake by not killing Iso & Nahashi immediately but placing them in a cold storage locker. Nahashi digs at the wall removing boxes and finds a vent from where they escape. Iso is instructed to call HFO and tell them about their location and the whole story. HFO follow the truck filled with guns to the dairy. They swarm the Dairy and The Dancer and his partner are captured. On my 6 star system, I would give Ready...Aim... 4 stars out of 6. The episode has a nice score with some Japanese style music you might hear in Double Exposure or The Year Of The Horse. John

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 18:58:49 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Speaking of Don Knight, I saw him in a couple of other shows recently. One was an episode of Mannix, where he played a guy with one arm. Unfortunately, I didn't pay much attention to this show, because I was becoming very disinterested in Mannix by that point. I might revisit this show later.

Last night, I watched an episode of Kojak from its third season. Knight plays this guy who is suspected of stealing a Rembrandt drawing from a gallery along with a partner, but the two of them actually conspired with the gallery owner to appear to have stolen it, in order for the owner to collect on the insurance.

This show is disappointing, showing a drop in quality at the end of this season along with a few other episodes. I hope this is not a sign of things to come with the last two seasons which I have not binge-watched yet. The second season had some outstanding shows, one of which featured John Randolph (Marty Sloane on Five-O) as a judge who runs into some very serious problems. There were only two shows in the second season which I thought were not particularly good.

In this third-season show with Knight, the script is very reminiscent of Five-Zero in that it becomes very stupid. David Opatoshu (who played Asian characters in Five-O, not particularly well) is a former European cop who is called in to help with the investigation of the disappearing Rembrandts. Opatoshu arranges to get Knight and his partner out of jail, slipping a hacksaw to Knight disguised as a wire (the plot machinations are kind of complicated to explain). Despite the fact that there are several other men incarcerated in the jail who can see the other cells through the open bars, Knight and his partner very loudly use this hacksaw to cut through the lock on their cell door and then Knight leaves the cell and knocks out a guard who comes in when the partner pretends to be sick! None of the other prisoners pay the slightest bit of attention to any of this. Talk about dumb.

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 14:04:58 MST


Submitted by: Jeff
From: Denver

This recent MANNIX talk got me to come out of hiding, as I think it's a very underrated quality show that didn't have anywhere near the syndication exposure that my beloved H5O had over the years. At least it got the same prestige DVD treatment from CBS DVD, otherwise I probably never would have discovered it in recent years.

Much like H5O, MANNIX's strongest element it has going for it is the lead actor, Mike Connors. The plots are often a cut above what you would normally find on the detective shows of the era (CANNON, BARNABY JONES, etc.), but Connors is the glue that makes it all work, and elevates it several notches above what a lesser actor could pull off. Supporting and recurring players including Gail Fisher, Robert Reed and Ward Wood do a great job in their roles, and have a nice, easygoing chemistry with Connors.

The show frequently has great music scores and cues as well, and lots of nice location shooting throughout the series.

Also like H5O, I find the earlier seasons (2 thru 4 or 5) best represent the show in its prime, with an occasional great one in the last few seasons as well. The first season is quite raw, with a totally different format (Mannix works for a hi-tech detective agency and has a boss, Joseph Campanella), but there are winners in this season as well, largely due to the chemistry of Connors and Campanella.

Anyone who enjoys 70s crime shows will hopefully enjoy this and want to check it out. I sincerely hope that some knucklehead at CBS doesn't try to remake or reboot it, though (I'm looking at you, Lenkov!)

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 13:50:49 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Over three months to go before next season, and Lenkov already has his Spoiler Generator cranked up to the max:

https://t.co/4UFCRgO1xh

My prediction (equally hideous): There will be a crossover between Lenkov's MacGyver reboot and Five-Zero!!! You heard it here first!!!

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 13:05:42 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

That's a tough question, John Chergi. Clearly Don Knight gave 100% to everything he did. I suppose I have two favorites: "The Ways of Love" and "'V' for Vashon: The Father."

In "The Ways of Love," it was in the way he said, "She used us, both, Dave," even though Dave knew that Steve Larsen was using him and was ready to dismember Steve limb by limb.

In "Vashon," it was the coolness with which he portrayed Dylan Heyward. We saw his every move, and he never blinked an eye, not even when facing Vashon's tough demeanor on the beach. The way he outlined each step he would have to take to plan the crime was brilliant! Of course, the writers get to take a large part of the credit for that.

Again, he gave 100% to everything he did.

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 11:05:26 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

John Chergi: Good question about Don Knight. Always playing a ruthless criminal from down under, although he was born in England.

My favorite Knight episode is "Flash of Color, Flash of Death". He plays the ruthless Hobbs who tries to get his stolen jade back (his life's work) at any cost. But my vote may be swayed by the attractive and sly Lynne Kimoto also being in that episode. A moderately close second episode would be "Ring of Life".

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 07:24:00 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

No, Rick, it's not you. You are right they were because many had lived through tough times and real challenges in the world. Today everybody is a "legend in their own minds" that thinks the world owes them everything and "Don't you know who I am?" type of mentality.

Today most of what these people get upset about is if their sheets on their hotel room beds aren't made of 100% Egyptian cotton because it might damage their wonderful skin.

It's a good insight by you and your dead on. In today's world though, their will be some genius that will argue how much better today's entitlement attitude is.

Remember when somebody is truly talented and powerful that they don't have to tell anybody. Humble is a sign of true ability and talent. Ego is insecurity in an actor or actress because they are not really sure of their skills.

Added: Friday 03 June 2016 07:21:01 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

I know I'm gonna sound like a grumpy old guy but the passing of Jimmy Borges has me thinking about all those entertainers who worked a lot as character actors and were familiar faces on TV through the 60's and 70's but were not really 'A' list celebrities. So sad to see them passing. What I liked is that as far as I could tell they actually enjoyed entertaining. At least it appeared so. Is it just me or were they more appreciative and humble about having a level of celebrity than today's bunch seem to be?

Added: Wednesday 02 June 2016 20:19:57 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Here's an obituary for Jimmy Borges that is not restricted to subscription users:

"Hawai'i Entertainer Jimmy Borges Dies" in Maui Now. May 31, 2016. http://mauinow.com/2016/05/31/hawai%ca%bbi-entertainer-jimmy-borges-dies/

Added: Wednesday 02 June 2016 18:34:35 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

I was curious if the Classic HFO fans know much about Frank Kamana entrance as a HFO detective. I can remember Frank in season 6 when the boat exploded in Why Wait Until Kevin Dies? and he had a good episode in A Gun For McGarrett tracking down leads on the hit man Benzinger and S.N. Savage. Also in Hit Gun For Sale tailing the guys into the movie house. I always thought he did an excellent job in the role. He played several roles in the early seasons of Five-O usually an HPD cop or Lt. of the squad type. He had a few years as Detective and then that was it. MY CLASSIC HFO QUESTION OF THE DAY: What is your FAV Don Knight performance on Classic HFO? John

Added: Wednesday 02 June 2016 18:23:36 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Jimmy Borges is featured big time in today's Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

There is an excellent article on the first page (continued on page 8) by Susan Essoyan, plus a two-page spread featuring a timeline of JB's life, as well as articles by veteran Hawaiian journalists Wayne Harada and Ben Wood.

If you can access a service called Library Press Display by PressReader through your local library, you can search for Honolulu Star-Advertiser and read this all close-up.

You can see reduced shots of these pages via my Twitter account @fiveohomepage

Added: Wednesday 01 June 2016 13:07:58 MST


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