Hawaii Five-O Discussion Forum -- February 2012

The Hawaii Five-O Discussion Forum -- February 2012



The following are archived comments from February, 2012. After looking around, please add your own comments!

Links back: Main PageDiscussion Forum Main PageDiscussion Forum Archives


Submitted by: Mississippi (aka...Big H)
From: El Dorado.....

This week's show was the funniest ever as I KNEW it would be, but not because of all the bromancing banter from our intrepid triumvirate, but rather from seeing which Caan would "out-gesticulate" the other. If you were to handcuff the Caans' hands behind their backs, they wouldn't be able to act a lick. The apple certainly didn't fall far from the tree with regards to their acting styles. Hilarious when Caan Sr. calls Steve-O "MaGoo." :D

Great to see Jimmy B back....

Added: Wednesday 29 February 2012 10:48:44 MST


Submitted by: Noni
From: Big Island

Did anyone catch this article in the "Star-Advertiser"?

http://www.staradvertiser.com/features/Caan_on_Caan.html

Added: Wednesday 29 February 2012 04:27:39 MST


Submitted by: Bookem
From: Maui

Thanks Maxine for the info...great song.

Added: Tuesday 28 February 2012 20:26:51 MST


Submitted by: Maxine
From: Brooklyn

Bookem: that song is "Love & Affection" by The Green

Added: Tuesday 28 February 2012 19:08:13 MST


Submitted by: Bookem
From: Maui

Does anyone know the name of the song on Feb 27, 2012 episode when Danny is at the pool with his daughter...it has a reggae beat and a lyric "you give me love and affection like no other women in nature"

Added: Tuesday 28 February 2012 15:55:56 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

james caan to the rescue

he was very good
"book him , Muscles"

but the ending was as stale as the pizza seen there. that was ugly ugly looking pizza!

Added: Tuesday 28 February 2012 10:01:52 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

Thanks for sharing those photos with us, channelsurferdude. I liked the one of Nehemiah Persoff and Jack Lord laughing. I wonder what they were laughing at.

Added: Tuesday 28 February 2012 09:19:52 MST


Submitted by: Barbara
From: CHICAGO

Mr. Mike said: "I liked tonight's show. The Crime of the Week was the usual B.S., but there was a great performance by Caan Senior, and lots of quotable dialogue."

I agree. The dialogue was pretty funny. Lots of one-liners to be remembered. James Caan didn't let us down. And what fun it was to see Jimmy Borges. Love him.

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 21:59:50 MST


Submitted by: Dan A
From: South Brunswick, NJ

It was Nice to see a familiar Five-O face in Jimmy Borges as owner of the vegetable/firewoks store.

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 21:03:11 MST


Submitted by: channelsurferdude
From: Tucson, AZ

While living in Hawaii I took a few pictures of episode #168 with Sal Mineo.
This was in 1974...It was called Hit Gun For Sale...

http://on.fb.me/y5piXq

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 20:41:40 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I liked tonight's show. The Crime of the Week was the usual B.S., but there was a great performance by Caan Senior, and lots of quotable dialogue.

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 20:16:33 MST


Submitted by: Otto
From: NYC

Ringfire: I might give Victor Reese top villain status for season 1. Big Chicken was fantastic, of course, and Jerry Parks was a classic, but Reese has a complexity of character that intrigues me, and he never broke into a sweat like the other two!!!

Rainbow: Yes, that's a great ending! I also like his smooth style as he tries to charm the undercover policewoman; priceless! As for the Danno/Bomb episode, that's one of the handful of episodes i remember seeing in its original broadcast. I was around 7 or 8 years old, and it was high-tension!

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 17:39:29 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

You're welcome, Rainbow!

I remember that part, too. All that tension in diffusign one bomb, only to find out that there are more!

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 14:18:13 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

"But what about the actual first aired episode, FULL FATHOM FIVE? one of my faves. The idea of being killed, stuffed into a barrel and sunk in the ocean is horrifying. And Victor Reese smiling during it all makes him one of the vilest and most hilarious villains of all FIVE-O!!! Any thoughts on this episode, Chick, Rainbow, anyone?"

Spot-on! One of the best episodes from the first season and Kevin McCarthy as Victor Reese probably gives the 3rd best performance of the season - just behind Gavin MacLeod as Big Chicken and Sam Melville as Jerry Parks. He's absolutely chilling! And charming! What a strange combination? That's one sick pup - his ear-to-ear grin while reciting poetry while watching the barrel with the woman sinking to the bottom of the ocean. Psycho!

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 12:17:55 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: NC

Here's one big reason the Samurai episode "flew" back in '68. Reportedly there were 5 Japanese minisubs during the Pearl attack, and for decades one sub was "unaccounted-for" until recently. Tokura's sub??

http://lat.ms/8kEnqw

Re-reading Mr. Mike's anal of Samurai, a notable tid-bit is the reminder that Samurai was the first ep filmed, but not the first one shown; as we know now, it was FFF w/ KMcC. This "switch" has always puzzled me. :!thinking:

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 11:22:50 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Many Thanks Vrinda!...I was going crazy trying to remember what season that was in. I absolutely love that show!

My favorite memories as a child were coming home from school on a Friday afternoon knowing I had the weekend off and settling in late those afternoons with a pizza and enjoying Five-O at four or five in the afternoon. The first time I saw this show with Danno, I'll never forget the shock I had when we all found out there were more bombs that had to be defused.

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 10:24:20 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

Hi, RW,

That episode is "The Clock Struck Twelve," from the fifth season. The opening sequence was also unique, with scenes of the criminals setting up the bomb, ending with McGarrett saying, "Boom!"

It was one my favorites from the fifth season, too.

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 09:38:08 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York,NY

Otto,

When I first joined this forum in the fall of 2010, "Full Fathom Five" was the show that you recommended to me the most, as I bought the first season of Five-O and started my descent into the full run of the show ( I'm now four episodes into the outstanding third season)"Full Fathom Five" turned out to be one of the best episodes of the series first two years in my opinion particularly because it has one of the best closing lines of any ending to a Five-o which was "He always was the lucky one." and then the close-up to the "Aloha" sign floating in the water. It was the best way to start off the run to the classic series.

Question for all in this forum. What is the name of the episode where Danno has to defuse a bomb step by step in unbearable suspense in a building, only to find out there are several more bombs in the building after he defuses the first one? I always loved this episode, and it was one of my favorites as a kid when I watched during reruns, but I can't remember the title and season it was in. The whole show was basically a tight close-up of Danno's sweating face and it was great tension. Anyone know the title of the episode and the season it ran in?

Added: Monday 27 February 2012 07:33:58 MST


Submitted by: AJ
From: NY

Nimo Linkoa, the thug from the first season's "No More Blue Skies" has apparently been sighted in a bar in western Canada. He's lightened his hair and grown a beard... and become somewhat lighter-skinned, probably due to the near-arctic climate...

http://on.fb.me/x53Dz3

:!drink:

Added: Sunday 26 February 2012 21:49:46 MST


Submitted by: Otto
From: New York

"You made one big fat mistake, Tokura!"

I give SAMURAI 2 and a half stars. But what about the actual first aired episode, FULL FATHOM FIVE? one of my faves. The idea of being killed, stuffed into a barrel and sunk in the ocean is horrifying. And Victor Reese smiling during it all makes him one of the vilest and most hilarious villains of all FIVE-O!!! Any thoughts on this episode, Chick, Rainbow, anyone?

Added: Sunday 26 February 2012 12:23:47 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

My boring "ultimate revised anal-ysis" of Samurai is here:

http://www.mjq.net/fiveo/5-0log1.htm#4

There are yet more reasons why I didn't like it, though I left the rating at 2 stars instead of dropping it to one and a half, as I was considering.

(Yes, I realize the episode is terribly iconic in so many ways...)

Added: Saturday 25 February 2012 18:03:53 MST


Submitted by: Big Chicken
From: The SAMURAI Fan Club

Mr. Mike, you certainly make a good case about the flaws in SAMURAI. But I gotta side with Rick & RingFire in ratin it as a great ep.

Like you sez, RingFire, all the great 5-Oh elements be there - you got a ruthless racketeer/gangster nemesis of McGarrett, the gov pressurin SteveO, and the banter/repartee between Steve and the villain which was one a the most enjoyable stapes of the series. And besides the cinematography of McG’s ride to Tokura’s place, the shootout at the pad where Steve is directin Tokura’s thugs is also visually striking. When I first seen it again on DVD - I was like wow.

I think the measure of Montalban’s performance is that I never thought, this would be a real good ep without em. Like "Babe Ruth,” where you can lament if they had James Shigeta, or Mako, or George Takai, RUTH would be a 4 Star affair instead of a dud. I thought Montalban did bring flash and presence to the role, which carried him through the challenge of playing a different ethnicity. He certainly hold his own with Jack.

Contrast that with David Opatoshu in "Face of the Dragon” and Will Kuluva’s bizarre lookin Mr. Lo in "Numbers,” who both be outright ridiculous. I prefer Montalban’s Japanese accent to Opatoshu’s slow-talkin, dime store Confucius-esque utterins in "Matter of Mutal Concern.”

You also got the blow up between Steve N Danno over the dead witness, and that great ending where Steve-O slap that sword in a box on Tokura, "Aloha Baby.”

Added: Saturday 25 February 2012 12:50:34 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

"...this show would have been a LOT better if they had used the word "samurai" instead of "bushido" ...HELLO -- the name of the show >is< "Samurai," after all!"

Ha! Good point Mike!

Added: Saturday 25 February 2012 09:59:27 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Montalban's acting is OK. But his makeup is silly, and his mannerisms are also annoying. In fact, his mannerisms should give McGarrett a big clue that something is wrong. Tokura/Montalban (T/M) has this sort-of-Japanese accent. This is likely due to the fact that T/M really >is< Japanese, he is "S. Yamashito," who abandoned the midget submarine he was piloting during World War II and assumed the identity of the real Tokura who, like him, was hiding in caves on Molokai to escape those who wanted to intern him during World War II. Presumably T/M killed the real Tokura and assumed his identity, though, as McGarrett says to his daughter Deedee "what happened to him [the real Tokura] is anybody's guess." McGarrett then says "After the war, your father came to back to Honolulu." (Does he mean here there T/M came back from Molokai to Oahu, or that he was eventually captured by the internment people and came back from the mainland?* In either case, as I have previously suggested, someone might have recognized that he was not the same person.) The real Tokura was born in San Francisco and came to the islands in 1939. Even if he had Japanese parents, one would suspect that he did not affect Japanese mannerisms and have a Japanese accent.

For me, this show would have been a LOT better if they had used the word "samurai" instead of "bushido" correctly and consistently throughout (the term is used correctly by McGarrett, referring to the code of honor, near the beginning of the show). HELLO -- the name of the show >is< "Samurai," after all! As well, the confrontation in the movie theatre should have happened somewhere else, like maybe a shopping centre or some other place where Deedee, the daughter, would be more likely to hang out. The movie shown in the theatre is pretty dumb, it's almost like a silent movie (the screen dimensions, in fact, suggest a 16mm film), with banal music throughout. When T/M is talking to Deedee in the theatre, you would expect that people would keep shushing them, because they are speaking very loudly, but no one says anything.

*The history of internment of Japanese people in Hawaii is interesting, because there were about 150,000 Japanese people in the islands around the time of Pearl Harbor, but only about 1% (in the neighborhood of 1,200) were interned briefly in camps on Oahu and later sent to the mainland.

Added: Saturday 25 February 2012 08:10:56 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

It still boggles the mind that folks have a problem with Rico Montalban as Tokura. I love his flamboyant performance! His repartee with McGarrett is perfect. His mannerisms remind me of a Bond villain. His Asian make-up is actually similar to Dr. No - played by Canadian Joseph Wiseman. I guess folks are offended by seeing Orientals played by non-Orientals. Personally I'm more interested in the performance and Montalban did a great job as Tokura. Contrast this with the wretched performance of Mark Lenard in "To Hell with Babe Ruth". Montalban had class, style. Lenard just ranted and raved until I wanted to throw something at the TV.

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 21:30:26 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

Funny thing, in that clip McG has already driven past Tokura's estate, then they cut to him pulling into the driveway.

Today on google earth there's a tennis court where those two round structures were. The house is still there - it remains a large property with an expansive lawn area - remarkable today considering the density of development in the Portlock neighborhood over the past forty years.

Here's an article about it from 2008:

http://bit.ly/waOrjc

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 17:57:47 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

McG rolls up on Tokura's place...

http://bit.ly/ACQCWq

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 16:05:08 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: Rawwwllleeee

"But would she have access to the money so quickly? Wouldn't there be the usual legal mumbo-jumbo like probating of his will, etc. after he dies?"

Not necessarily. Not sure about Cananda, but here in the states you can establish what is called "right-of-survivorship" on financial accounts that name beneficiary(ies) who will receive funds immediately outside of probate court upon the passing of the account holder. If Tokuru had one of these set up for his daughter, the funds would pass to her immediately. I have several accounts like this for me to pass funds to my Mom quickly should I meet up with Whoa-Phat in a dark alley somewhere without my 9 handy....

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 15:28:09 MST


Submitted by: otto
From: new york

It all comes down to the poor choice of actor to play TOKURA. Montalban's a great actor, but not as a Japanese guy. But, i do like that episode. And the theme music variation featured as McG drives to Tokura's pad is priceless. (See music section on this site for a reminder. And you can download it!)

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 14:56:59 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I had a good laugh when Tokura introduces his daughter to McGarrett. McG gives her a leering look, and Tokura's reaction is priceless -- as if he could kill McGarrett right on the spot!

Something else that bugs me about this episode. At the beginning one of the bushido dudes shoots Tokura point blank, but Tokura is wearing a bulletproof vest (Kevlar was not invented until the mid-1970s, so it is something else). Instead of getting examined by the cops or even detained, Tokura merely gets up and walks into the hearing room! You would think that if someone shoots you at such close range, even when wearing one of these vests, there would still be a considerable impact. What is more astounding, Bob Sevey doesn't bother to duck down, but after the attempted assassination, he resumes talking on the camera as if nothing has happened, saying something like "All hell has broken loose here!"

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 14:39:47 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

Mike,

I haven't seen this episode in a while, so all the details are hazy, but maybe the real Tokura never made it to being fingerprinted at the internment camp, and escaped before that.

As for the daughter not acting like a high-roller, maybe the intent wasn't to portray her as such. High-rollers tend to be very carefree, not the cautious and suspicious type that this girl was.

I'd have to see this episode again to figure out all the details you mentioned.

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 14:20:41 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Yeah, the aerial shot of McGarrett driving to Tokura's joint is very cool (as is the color photography, to comment on an earlier posting) ... until you look closely at the ground-level shot of him driving, and then notice that on the driver's side is a bunch of foliage which is not seen in the shot from above!

At least this is a real shot of him driving, rather than a process shot as seen during the mindless "carguments" on the new show. Ditto for another driving sequence shot where Tokura's thugs are seen firing shotguns into a couple of goons playing pool. As they drive away quickly, by the way, you can see the marquee of some porno movie theatre.

I am wondering about the end of the show. McGarrett fools Tokura into thinking that the two guys at the top of the ship's gangplank are bushido dudes (whereas in reality, they are just HPD cops who arrest Tokura after he confesses to murdering Mary Travers). BUT ... let's assume that Tokura went to the top of the gangplank and the two guys were really bushido and they knocked off Tokura. Because they are on the ship, are they exempt from McGarrett arresting them or not (especially since it would be really obvious if they shot Tokura dead right there and then).

By the way, the reason that the daughter gives the $1 million to the university is because McGarrett convinces her to do this to smoke her father out of hiding. But would she have access to the money so quickly? Wouldn't there be the usual legal mumbo-jumbo like probating of his will, etc. after he dies? And why is Tokura so pissed about this that he emerges from seclusion? Because he figures that McGarrett put her up to this? If so, he should obviously smell a trap!

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 12:06:40 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

SAMURAI is a very interesting episode to rate. I love the first half of it (up until Tokura is "killed" by the bushido) but the second half seems to meander - what with the supposedly deceased Tokura making secret contacts with his daughter and something about the daughter wanting to donate some money to some university. But the first half is crackling Five-0 - the governor telling McG that the "senseless violence" has to stop, the death of Mary Travis on the witness stand, Danno getting chewed out by McG, the crackling repartee between McG and Tokura at his villa on Portlock Rd. Speaking of which, you gotta love that beautiful long shot of McG driving along Portlock Rd. to Tokura's villa - accompanied by a wonderful rendition of the Five-0 theme by Mort Stevens. Classic stuff! But unfortunately the second half seems to lose its way. Though I do love the "Aloha, baby" finale where McG gives the passport to Tokura at the ship.

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 11:59:11 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

I would include SAMURAI in with the best of the best episodes. Visually it is nothing short of stunning - It seems to have almost a feature film quality. I don't know if it's shot in a different format than later eps or what.

>>>This is a real "don't think about it too hard" episode.<<<

To some extent the same could be said of most eps, no?

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 11:03:43 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I watched some of Samurai (I almost said "Bushido") again ... the problem with this episode is the writers had a potentially interesting idea, but then they decided to flesh it out without thinking too hard (shades of the recent show).

For example: The "bushido" guys (supposedly vengeful samurai) are shown at the beginning. Except these guys are PRIESTS. Despite this error, why do these guys want to knock off Tokura, who has never been outside of the USA? Is this a crime-related thing? Or do they know that he is really this Japanese midget submarine guy from WW II who basically deserted his post (so the honor-obsessed "bushido" want to kill him because he was a traitor)? If so, how would they know this, because Tokura has an iron-clad alibi, saying that he survived on Molokai where he fled to when the US government tried to intern him after Pearl Harbor because he was a "Jap.". Even McGarrett doesn't know Tokura's real identity until he sends the fingerprints to Japan.

But then there are further questions. According to McGarrett, in the caves on Molokai where Tokura was hiding, there was also other this guy (the "real" Tokura) who was another local fleeing from the people who wanted to intern him. What happened to the real Tokura? Did Montalban's character kill him?

And who is the body that they used for this elaborate setup (the guy who gets his face blown off with a shotgun, because he looks like Montalban, etc., etc.)? Surely they didn't keep the real Tokura around in a closet all these years, and even if they did, what are the chances that he would resemble Montalban? You would think that after World War II and Tokura/Montalban came back from the Molokai caves, someone he knew might realize that he is not the same person.

Presumably some of Tokura's associates are in on this blow-his-face-off-with-a-shotgun scam ... we hope that Tokura's hired muscle are very loyal!

When McGarrett says he is sending the prints to Tokyo, I assumed he meant the prints from the dead body (in which case it would be obvious it was NOT Tokura, who I am sure was fingerprinted in Hawaii (why doesn't McGarrett check this first?). Tokura says in the past he has been "charged" (but never convicted), etc. But no, it is actually (I assume it is anyway) the prints from Tokura's criminal record, which the guys in Tokyo can tell McGarrett is the submarine dude. On the other hand, you would figure that the real Tokura, who was fleeing from the internment people in WW II, had also been "fingerprinted," in which case someone could have determined that Montalban's identity was not legit a long time ago.

If they used a real Asian instead of Montalban, at least this would make the delightful repartee between the character and McG more interesting. Montalban smokes a cigarette like Arte Johnson on Laugh-In and has this annoying "Japanese" accent. On the other hand, the dame playing Tokura's daughter is supposed to be a high-rolling type, sort of like the daughter in When Does A War End? But she doesn't come across like this at all. You have to wonder why she bothers to go to the movie theatre -- she doesn't strike me as the type that would do this. It obviously wasn't at her request that her father showed up, because she is surprised when he suddenly sits beside her and starts speaking to her (i.e., she had no idea that he would be there). And then how did her father know she would be at the movie theatre on this certain day at this certain time, etc., etc.?

This is a real "don't think about it too hard" episode.

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 10:07:26 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Big Chicken- I loved your comments on "The Second Shot" earlier this week as always.

I watched "Time and Memories" last night and I thought this was a powerhouse show with just a few quibbles. Acting was first rate by all and the Jack Lord stare at James McArthur when Danno suggests Steve remove himself from the case was priceless. Also, the photography in this show was the some of the best that I have seen in the first three years. The scene at the Pearl Harbor Arizona Memorial where Steve Mcg and Kathy go on their first date was unbelievably beautiful, and shot so well that I actually thought I was there. It's the closest you can get to feeling you are at the Arizona Memorial without being there. Truly stunned at the camera angles as well. Plus the shot of the Dolphins jumping out of the water at the hotel that Jack and Martin Sheen were walking poolside around was breathtaking. Just a wonderful shot and some of the best color I have seen in the show to this point.

I took note of Mr. Mike's problems with the murder time line in his "analysis", but H50 Forever and others... here is a troublesome question for you. Wouldn't it have been logical for McGarett and Kathy to resume dating at the end of the show? They were in love in the past, and he wanted her to stay with him in Hawaii, but she promised someone else that she would marry him. That looks like Frank, her husband that was killed at the beginning of the show. She admits to Steve she wasn't happy in the marriage, and that she called him at the beginning of the show to tell him he was right about her decision to marry this guy, and then at the end of the show, her husband's dead, Steve's single, she's single, there was obviously still feelings between the two, so why not start dating again?...She inexplicably flies back to San Francisco with her daughter and we get the same ending as my fave "Singapore File"...the wave goodbye at the airport. We talked months ago about why it wouldn't have worked to have McG married in the show, but wouldn't it have been logical to have him at least start dating Kathy?...it wasn't even addressed. That didn't make sense as well.

Added: Friday 24 February 2012 08:31:33 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

another meh episode. fell ill watching DEFENDER and got the stomach bug overnite, BLECH!

I am ok now and looking forward to father and son next week.

Added: Thursday 23 February 2012 14:49:51 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Well, 24 and syndication simply don't mix. In fact I would heavily advise folks AGAINST watching 24 in syndication. That show is meant to be watched on DVD only - in the proper order and without annoying commercials. I don't even know anyone who got into that show by watching it in syndication. Everyone I know has gotten into it via the DVDs. Unlike of course shows that we grew up with - FIVE-0, BONANZA, KNIGHT RIDER, ROCKFORD FILES, etc. We fell in love with those shows via syndication. At least I did.

Speaking of syndicating serialized shows good luck showing LOST in syndication. I've never seen that show but from what I understand the story begins with S1ep1 and ends with the last episode of the series. That's basically one long story that spans the entire show. At least 24 features a new story every season.

Added: Thursday 23 February 2012 12:44:27 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: Move that grass around, baby....

Ringfire says>>"Those who watch 24 know that they need to start every season with episode 1 and watch until the final 24th episode. That's the only way to watch that show."

And that format absolutely has killed "24", an otherwise stellar show, in syndication. It's been off for what --2 or 3 years now, and I've only seen it once, and even then the couple of shows I watch, it was difficult to "pick it up." (And I saw all 8 seasons...) But back to 5-0...

I thought this week's ep, the first w/o Weston, was actually decent. It wasn't a Vashon trilogy or Hookman, but it didn't lay an egg either, IMO. It managed to do something that 5-0 1.0 never did.....the opening scenes were accompanied by Elvis' "Rock-a-Hula Baby," which I thought was so campy that it was mildly entertaining. (But then, 5-0 1.0 had the genius of Stevens and Ray to hold its own in the score dept., so they didn't really need Elvis) There was no mind-blowing stunt like last week's, unless you want to call the motorbike-in-the-ocean ala Magnum Force a fantastic stunt (not). Usually the carguments are irritating, but this time I actually enjoyed McG's chewing on Danno's @$$ in the first cargument [for what I think was payback for letting the dog sleep in his bed]. Whatever that lulu was at the end I can live without..... (I can just see JL's McG inviting his braaaas over for a seedless-blackberry-jam-on-wheat-and-parmesian-mushroom-omelette party at the end of a show.)

Added: Thursday 23 February 2012 11:09:36 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

Excellent comments, LB and Rainbow Warrior. Speaking of "The Odd Couple," did you notice the Mercury in the closing credits? It is stopped at a red light. You can only see the front grill and quarter panel, but it's definitely a Mercury, perhaps a '66 Park Lane???

Added: Thursday 23 February 2012 09:39:52 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

I agree with L.B.'s thoughts completely. The great TV shows that have stood the test of time like "The Honeymooners", "Cheers" "Bonanaza" "Perry Mason" "Seinfeld" have universal themes that stand up to the test of time like "MASH." I used to think that E.R. would stand up well in reruns because the universality of medical issues that affect everyone, but they lost so many cast members, the plots because silly
"events", like a helicopter crash on top of the hospital, and they used the show in it's last years to have its characters mouth nasty liberal propaganda against George W. Bush that it ruined the show, and many people including I turned it off.

If you can put a show in a time period of history it can stand the test of time, but if you make the pop cultural references too specific it will not hold up well in reruns, but the problem is today's world is very "in the now", instant gratification oriented, so the shows reflect that problem. Also, every time there is a great show like "Prime Suspect" or "Detroit 187" that are well done and intelligent there is never any audience for them, the ratings are terrible, and the great shows die. I think the reason so many of us watch the old Five-O is that the best television we can find is from the old days "when we were young."...Heck "The Odd Couple" is still being shown every day in NYC, and that show IMHO is still side splitting.

Added: Thursday 23 February 2012 08:57:45 MST


Submitted by: james c ailes
From: indiana

hi there , it was good to see ohno on five-o but i thought he was portrayed worng , he shoud be reshot as a positive careicter as being a high profill sports icon, i no this is just t/v but he surely deserved a much more important suject on the show ! i hope you would reshoot him in a more positive form on Hawaii five-o , im realy enjoying the program as remembering the old show as well , i like the new version so much better because of the mix of actors , great shots of the island because most of use will never make it to the islands to see first hand the beauty of Hawaii . great show so glad its back on the network! thanks very much , jim

Added: Thursday 23 February 2012 08:41:49 MST


Submitted by: L.B.
From: U.S.A.

With an eye to the future in syndication and DVD releases, other bugaboos to avoid are incessant topicality and poor handling of important series moments.

While these issues are not really applicable to either version of Hawaii Five-O, they have affected other series for the worst. As an example, All In The Family and Maude were two of the most successful sitcoms of the 1970s. Maude in particular has rarely been seen in reruns since that time, while All In The Family has not been as successful as you would expect a five-time number one show in the Nielsens to be in that medium. In both instances, constant references to current issues and themes of the time (the Vietnam War, President Nixon and other politicians of that era) made for some good laughs then. However, if viewing either program now, you almost would have had to have lived then to catch some of the jokes (laughs). And let’s face it, many of those events were so long ago that you may not remember them fast enough to laugh before the next line of dialogue. Certainly both programs are still entertaining and watchable now, but have lost some of their original luster because of this.

Poor handling of important series moments that ultimately stretch logic and credibility such as Bobby Ewing reappearing in the shower after being killed in a car accident on Dallas and Thomas Magnum suddenly waking up on the operating table after being pronounced dead provide Jump The Shark moments that fans remember. In the case of these two series, those events mark the time when many fans will stop purchasing DVD releases or watching the show in reruns. These moments for a TV series can become the equivalent of a pro athlete who had an otherwise successful career but is most remembered for an embarrassing mistake in a big game.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 19:02:25 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Another show which mixed stand-alone episodes with those connected to each other was The X-Files. Having both kinds of episodes didn't hurt the show's ratings for most of its nine seasons.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 13:38:18 MST


Submitted by: Bill
From: Palm Beach County Florida

Ringfire,

Television shows swinging between stand alone episodes and ones connected to past shows isn't unusual. Star Trek Deep Space Nine did it all the time.

Personally I prefer my television cop dramas with as little 'personal drama' as possible.(If I want to watch soap operas, I'll turn on a soap) The original Five-0 did without the personal drama, Law & Order did it most of its 20 year run(Towards the end they deviated and the writers did the same thing during Benjamin Bratt's time on the show. How many of us remember his character's wife having MS and that being the excuse for him to leave the show?) , and were good shows. CSI Miami, which I watched because I found it campy, has become so focused on the dramas of the characters that I stopped watching it about 3 years ago.

In fact right now there isn't a network show that I do watch. I stopped watching the new Five-0 after the Robert Loggia episode from season 1.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 13:23:24 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

You said it, L.B. These ongoing storylines are a popular fad these days but won't fare very well when folks just want to check out an episode here and there in the future on the DVD. It seems that the writers/producers don't know which way you go. They either need to just focus on standalone crime-of-the-week stories (as in the original) or go for a full-on serialized version (like on 24). Those who watch 24 know that they need to start every season with episode 1 and watch until the final 24th episode. That's the only way to watch that show. The original Five-0 was the exact opposite - you could watch any episode from any season without any problems. With the new Five-0 they seem to want to have it both ways - sometimes they want to give us a standalone crime-of-the-week episode and at other times they want to give us a series of episodes that are connected. Make up your minds!

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 12:42:30 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

"What I meant about more talk and less action was that Steve went from being a hands on leader of his team (like the sargent of a combat platoon) leading but also in the trenches to a detached leader at the phone in his office until the end where he would either appear in a helicopter with a blazing machine gun or a pontificating lecturer to the culprit."

I have heard those comments made about the episodes from the show's second six years, but after watching several from Seasons 6-11 (I only saw three episodes from Season 12), I noticed that many of the things people accuse McGarrett of becoming are exaggerated. The machine gun-shooting from a helicopter was in Season 9's "Double Exposure," and the pontificating lecturing was not a frequent occurrence. I read that he gave a lecture at the end of Season 12's "Use a Gun, Go to Hell," but I haven't seen that one, so I can't comment on that, but Steve did not sound preachy in all these episodes, or stay in the shadows until the very end.

During Seasons 7-9, there was a mix of Steve leading the team like a platoon leader, giving orders but working alongside them, episodes where he sat beind his desk while Danno and company went into the field, and episodes where the guest stars got more scenes and where the stories revolved around their characters, but when the focus was on Five-O in those episodes, it was the same teamwork with Steve leading the pack. In between, there were episodes centering on Danno, like "Deadly Persuasion," "Retire in Sunny Hawaii - Forever," "The Young Assassins," though none focusing on Chin except "Death in the Family," but Chin did get his own scenes where he got to shine in other shows.

In Seasons 10 and 11, there is more of Steve conducting most of the investigations, with Danno, Chin, and Duke providing assistance and doing the usual evidence-gathering and suspect-questioning, but also some episodes that focused on guest stars, with Steve still taking he lead in the investigation. I can't comment on Season 12 in detail, like I said earlier.

Overall, there was a mixture of different amounts of exposure and functions for Steve and the other Five-O members, but not to the point where Steve was not around for most of the action, only to come in at the end with a lot of violence in his wake or to give a preachy speech. I think they were trying to go for variations in plot and not make everything predictable.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 11:23:29 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Expanded thoughts on Monday's show:

http://www.mjq.net/fiveo/2010-logtwo.htm#17

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 09:33:05 MST


Submitted by: Maxine
From: Brooklyn

OK, I didn't realize Tommy Sands was in all that stuff. Actually I think he's a very good actor, and "No Blue Skies" is a sentimental favorite, since it's the first Five-O episode I ever saw. I will grant the point that the old show seemed to, as a rule, avoid putting complete amateurs into starring roles.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 09:23:45 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

To John Hall - - Re: Leonard Freeman - - He did not depart Five-0. He died as a result of complications of heart surgery.

To Big Chicken - - Re: "McGarrett likes to eat criminals like Charlie Bombay and Joe Matsukino for breakfast - - ROFL. You got that right, bruddah!

To Maxine - - Re: Kam Fong not being a real actor - - I beg to differ. He had experience acting in stage productions in Hawai`i. Those appearances led to his being asked to audition for the role of Wo Fat in the pilot. When he walked into the room, Leonard Freeman took one look at him and knew he had found the right man to portray Chin Ho.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 09:01:51 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Tommy Sands "barely an actor"? I don't think so. In fact, of the 24 roles he appeared in (according to IMDB), his Five-O appearances (2) were near the end of his acting career. While a teen idol who may have more notoriety for marrying Nancy Sinatra, he appeared in Zane Grey Theater, Wagon Train, Bonanza, Mr. Novak, even the film The Longest Day, etc. Nancy Wilson also had a couple of dramatic appearances before showing up on Five-O: Burke's Law, Room 222 and I Spy. She later appeared on The F.B.I., Police Story and, more recently, The Sinbad Show. Jimmy Borges and Yvonne Elliman better fit the bill of singers making the transition to actors.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 06:19:48 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Interesting article. Does this apply to the new Five-O?

http://www.avclub.com/articles/did-the-sopranos-do-more-harm-than-good-hbo-and-th,69596/

Follow-up by another critic:

http://entertainment.time.com/2012/02/21/serial-killers-are-hbo-style-dramas-ruining-the-tv-episode/

I like this quote from the second page:

"[C]reating a layered, lengthy narrative is really f*cking hard,” and a number of shows have wasted viewers’ time trying to tell stories beyond their skill sets.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 06:09:41 MST


Submitted by: Maxine
From: Brooklyn

Non-actors in the original series: Nancy Wilson. Tommy Sands was barely an actor. Jimmy Borges. Yvonne Elliman was in "Jesus Christ Superstar" but was really known as a pop singer. Of course, Kam Fong and Herman Wedemeyer were non-actors, but that's probably not what we're talking about.

Added: Wednesday 22 February 2012 00:13:58 MST


Submitted by: Big Chicken
From: Sea-Town

"Mentioning what McG likes to eat for breakfast...is not character development."

C’mon, over 12 years we learns that Steve McGarrett likes to eat criminals like Charlie Bombay and Joe Matsukino for breakfast. :D

Man, we learn mo’ bout Steve and the boys through exposition than any brain dump of gratuitous back story. For instance, we learn lots bout what kinda cat Steve is though his indignant speech to those peacenics in "Not that Much Different.”

And hey, Rainbow Warrior, besides McGarrett’s wrap’round shades in "2nd Shot” – how bouts Steve grabbin that funky rifle to finish off Eric B. Thought that endin was ahead of its time far as irony and black comedy ("one more inch and he would have lived.”) pretty Tarantinoesque for the Five. You right though, hard to explain Eric B pickin up that gun & leavin prints.

And a shout out to you Mister Mike, for your most diligent research: "Fascinating fact: Sam Melville's character uses the expression "baby" 12 times" That’s the kind of investigative work make Che Fong envious.

"Che –That’s my corpus delicti!” :D

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 23:22:24 MST


Submitted by: John hall
From: Montreal

I just watched last nights episode online and now reading the last few postings I see that you guys nailed it.

My take on the new show is that they take so much time on personal and ongoing side stories that too little time is left to develop the actual story of the week. Having 20% less airtime than the original show doesn't help either.

The original show was the opposite, too little time was invested in the lives of the characters which left you feeling that there was no continuity to the series. But it did allow for that nice slowly accelerating collection of the pieces of the puzzle culminating in the cracking of the case. Enjoyable.

As for my comments yesterday about the later seasons of the old show I need to clarify what I meant a bit. First is the departure of Freeman led to the show losing that critical pulse of the changing viewer tastes. Jack might have had other qualities but he was not an experienced producer with that golden touch.

What I meant about more talk and less action was that Steve went from being a hands on leader of his team (like the sargent of a combat platoon) leading but also in the trenches to a detached leader at the phone in his office until the end where he would either appear in a helicopter with a blazing machine gun or a pontificating lecturer to the culprit.

Just my 2¢

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 19:59:02 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

You said it very well, LB. I was thinking the same thing about the story arcs and sub plots on the new show, and most new shows, for that matter.

These things will get viewers hooked now, when the show is in its first run and we don't know what will happen next. When the show ends its run and these storylines have been resolved, their excitement is lost because those who saw these episodes in the first run will know how they turned out.

People seeing the new show in reruns or on DVD who didn't see it in its first run might be interested in this element like the previously-mentioned group, but once they've seen it all, it will not be as exciting or suspenseful anymore, either.

With Jean Smart's character, it was a surprise to find ou that she was corrupt but, looking back, it doesn't seem like a believable concept. People will see Lori and will wonder why she was there to begin with, as with Jenna Kaye. Danny's (I can't even bring myself to call him Danno) personal side stories are unoriginal to begin with, and people who are not interested in that storyline will find it a hindrance to main storyline and will wonder if it will ever end.

I liked the crime-of-the-week with the special episodes that focused on one of the main characters once in a while, like those you mentioned. They gave us the best of both worlds. In the crime-of-the-week, the focus is on crime in Hawaii and how Five-O cracks the case. In the episodes that center on individual members of Five-O, the focus is on how they deal with a problem that will affect them not only personally, but professionally, and will affect all of Five-O and Hawaii, as well have a tie-in to crime and maintaining law and order.

In "Cry,Lie," it wasn't just Chin's job and freedom on the line, but the criminals' extortion scheme would have discredited all of Five-O. Their aim was to go all the way to the top, to get Steve indicted.

In "... And They Painted Daisies on His Coffin," it wasn't just the fact that Danno could go to jail if they didn't find the gun, but a drug dealer like Big Chicken would have continued to peddle drugs to kids.

In " 'V' For Vashon: The Patriarch," it wasn't just that Steve was framed for murdering what appeared to be an unarmed man, and Steve would end up in jail and be killed. It was also that a witness got away with lying on the stand, the Vashons would be free to contineue their crime spree and more people would be hurt or killed, Dominick and Honore Vashon would have gotten away with framing Steve, and Manicote, Doc, and Drew would have Steve's blood on their hands if anything happened to him.

There were repurcussions for everyone involved in these stories, not just the characters around whom they centered.

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 18:22:40 MST


Submitted by: L.B.
From: U.S.A.

While continuing storylines and subplots can add to a show during its’ original prime time run, these things can make a series less desirable to watch in syndication and DVD releases.

The original Five-O episodes are still entertaining 30-40 years later in large part because of its’ emphasis on the crime of the week rather than on the characters’ personal lives and situations. This made the episodes where we did get a deeper glimpse at the characters' lives ("Cry, Lie”, "Beautiful Screamer”, "Once Upon A Time”, etc.) all the more special, but it worked because the this information was connected heavily with the story. Ongoing storylines such as Danny’s relationship with his ex-wife and dealing with her husband Stan, the Lori character, and gotcha revelations such as the Governor’s ties to Wo Fat at the end of the first season will not serve the new show well down the road in my view. If one is viewing a season one episode 8-10 years from now, it will be harder to take Jean Smart’s character seriously remembering that she was corrupt. One will also want to just skip over any scenes which involved the Lori character, which didn’t amount to much. Danny’s relationships with his ex-wife, her new husband, and his daughter will also not be as entertaining because we will know how all of that turns out.

I do not feel that the current series needs these side stories in order to be successful. Each member of the Five-O team is capable of delivering a strong performance in any given episode, and some of the bad guys in this version (particularly James Marsters and Mark Dacascos) are as evil and menacing as the best of them on the original series. Classic yet clever good vs. evil stories without soap opera elements still make the original entertaining to this day. Following this example would serve the current series better now and in the future.

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 16:21:02 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

"Yes, Freeman did emphasize clever storylines, action and explosive confrontations, but c'mon--CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT??? Mentioning what McG likes to eat for breakfast or that he goes jogging is not character development. "

Jeff, where does it say that I'm even talking about the main characters? I'm talking about the guest stars' characters. They were the ones on whom most of the attention was given, which was why we didn't get to see too much development of the main characters.

The character development on the new show is nonexistant. Their personalities were established early on, and there's been no change, despite all those crazy personal side stories the writers have written. They were going off on different tangents, and not focusing on making this a crime drama, but a comedy-crime-soap opera, and failed miserably.

In explanation of my previous post, I'm not talking about what Steve eats for breakfast, that he goes jogging, or Danno's favorite color. That is development. That is background information.

The main characters displayed different personality traits, which were used depending on the storyline and allowed the viewer to see different sides to them. Steve changed from being very inert, hot-headed, and hostile in early seasons to being calmer and more docile, except when he was defending Five-O or his men. Chin would be serious at times, and jovial at others. Steve also showed a friendly, warm, gentle side at times.

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 15:19:55 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Victorino appeared in a cameo role during the teaser, where this group of pharmaceutical employees are bonding together out in the Oahu wilderness. One of their members, this dame, thinks this is all a lot of hooey, and starts to go back to the nearest bar to suck back mai tais, and runs into the victim of the Crime of the Week while she is traipsing through the jungle.

I can't think of any non-actors in the original series similar to those who have appeared in the last two years with the new show.

By the way, the show next week looks very interesting, and I hope it will not disappointment me like last night's did. Aside from James Caan, who -- based on the preview -- treats Danno in a sarcastic manner, it will also feature Jimmy Borges (seen for a fraction of a second in the preview) and Dennis Miller, an obnoxious radio host who gets blown up.

Any show that blows up Dennis Miller can't be bad ... I'm thinking of giving the show four stars already. :p

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 15:05:11 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

I heard that our Phillie Shane Victorino appeared in last night's episode. Did he just do a cameo or did he play an actual role?

Which leads me to another issue with this new show. Instead of casting REAL actors to play various roles they cast various celebrities (who have no acting talent whatsoever) to play various key parts. I mean what are guys like Victorino and P. Diddy doing on this show? Aside from drawing in a young demographic obviously.

Seriously - can you imagine Wilt Chamberlain guest starring on the old Five-0 as some cop from Philly who locks horns with McGarrett? Or Paul McCartney guest-starring as a British agent? :!thinking: Of course not. They cast REAL actors back in the day. That's why we watched guys like Andrew Duggan, Simon Oakland, Harry Guardino, Marj Dusay, etc. Not celebrities. The story goes right down the drain when you watch pop stars/sports stars on the screen playing serious roles. It's laughable! That's why the new Five-0 continues to flounder in mediocrity.

I'm already amused just thinking about a potential episode of 24 where Jack Bauer is interrogating a CTU mole - played by Britney Spears! :D

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 13:50:52 MST


Submitted by: Gem
From: Ohio

I liked last night's show, too, except for the usual criminal procedure disasters. Just in case CBS does read this- here is what I think boils down to the main problem with the "writing." The show needs an experienced detective and litigation attorney on staff to make sure that the scripts are consistent with what happens in the real world. The interrogations, assaults, illegal evidence collection, etc would just not hold up in court. Finding the bad guy and booking them is not the end. The State has to prove the case with solid evidence.

So much of the old show was about collecting evidence. How many times did McGarrett know who the bad guy was but he couldn't prove it? How many times did he come up with some clever way to obtain evidence?

For example,last night McGarrett observed a graffiti threat painted on one of the victim's ships and learned that the victim had been threatened before. I expected McGarrett to say: "get Che down here and photograph that and analyze the paint etc etc" because that's evidence if the graffit-writer turned out to be the murderer. The person behind the graffiti-writing did indeed become the #1 suspect. But does McGarrett collect any evidence - noooo, he just watches them wash it off the ship. And yes, it turned out that he obtained better evidence of the threat in the video, but he didn't know that at the time they were washing the ship.

Many of the complaints about the show seem to be related to the question of "could that/would that really happen?" Fix those issues with experienced people on staff and this might be a decent show.

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 12:39:58 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

I watched last night's episode just to see Al Harrington, who will always be Ben Kokua to me.

The story was excellent! We were able to follow the case from beginning to end. We learned about the ali'i tongue, which you may recall Jack explained on The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour in October 1971. There were no weird surprises. I enjoyed it, except...

- Can't AOL and SC find a way to stop bickering like school boys???
- Can't everyone remember that the purpose of speaking is to communicate, not to win a race.
- I wish Al Harrington had had more than one scene.

I'm also glad that Lori has left the show. She did not add a thing to it, even though in her first appearance, we were told to expect great things from her by way of keeping the Five-0 team in check.

All in all, a good episode. Give us more like it (with the above changes).

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 10:53:49 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Typical fan reaction to last night's episode is along the lines of "Ding dong, the bitch [i.e., Lori] is dead." Even people who, prior to this, were having a rational discussion about things like "Peter Lenkov should be replaced as showrunner" suddenly have a glazed look on their face like cult members, saying things like "Wow, what a great return to the 'core values' of the show," blah blah blah. Depressing!

There were numerous good things about the show, but my feeling is people should not forget that we wasted our time with 16 episodes of Lori bullshit. As well, last night's episode was a throwback to the first season ... it's sort of like we hadn't progressed at all!

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 10:08:36 MST


Submitted by: Jeff
From: Denver

While I agree with Vrinda's comment that there was still quite a bit of action in seasons 7-9, we disagree on the following statement:
"Freeman emphasized storylines and character development along with action."

Yes, Freeman did emphasize clever storylines, action and explosive confrontations, but c'mon--CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT??? Mentioning what McG likes to eat for breakfast or that he goes jogging is not character development. And we knew even LESS about Danno, Chin, Kono and the rest other than a stray episode here or there in the 6 seasons that Freeman was associated with. I love the show and love the characters, but let's face it---character development was kept to a minimum in the series, it would have interfered with the storytelling, the scenery, the action and the prolific villains. It wasn't really the writing that created our love for these characters, it was what the actors brought to the roles themselves, their natural talent, charisma and charm, that made us care for them more than anything else.
Heck, the new show has more actual character development than the old series, and that hasn't necessarily served it very well.

Just my 2-cents worth...

Added: Tuesday 21 February 2012 09:36:04 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

"As for the season 12 comments all I can add is that while there were many good episodes in later years the death of Leonard Freeman was the beginning of the end. Less action from Steve and too much talking. By season 12 the show was tired and dated to Hell."

There was still plenty of action in Seasons 7-9. The action was slowed down a bit during 10 and 11, and picked up somewhat in Season 12. As far the dated notion, blame it on the bad scripts that were written for 12.

Freeman emphasized storylines and character development along with action. He wasn't all about the action. Without the well-written storylines and interesting characters, the shows done during his years on Five-O would not have been good or as memorable. The action scenes get your adrenaline pumping and provide thrills, but they can't carry the storyline.

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 21:26:23 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Can't get excited about tonight's Five-0: the usual tried-&-true formula with red herrings, carguments (2), not-so-subtle product placement, blue-lit interrogations (2), nice scenery, very Hawaiian moments; by the end, it's obvious who did it (not many suspects left), the ending was upbeat (nothing to do with the crime) and a soap opera which went on for 3-1/4 minutes!!

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 20:20:14 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

LB: "I don’t know why, but it also seemed weird to me when watching the ending credits for "The Flight Of The Jewels” and I saw the copyright date was 1980." - - Me, too, LB. Is it because we tend to associate Five-0 with 1968? Is it because 1980 seems fairly recent in comparison to 1968? I'm not really sure, but I do know that a LOT happened between those two years, both in the world in general and in my personal life. It's almost as though those years were in two separate lifetimes.

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 18:46:13 MST


Submitted by: John Hall
From: Montreal Canada

Noticed that Al Harrington is going to be in tonights episode. Hope it's a good one, looks interesting.

As for the season 12 comments all I can add is that while there were many good episodes in later years the death of Leonard Freeman was the beginning of the end. Less action from Steve and too much talking. By season 12 the show was tired and dated to Hell.

I remember first seeing Magnum P.I. only a few months after the last H5O and feeling that I had jumped forward 12 years in terms of it being fresh and new. (don't get me wrong, H5O is still my favorite tv show ever, but it's time had long passed by then.

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 18:43:17 MST


Submitted by: L.B.
From: U.S.A.

I watched S12 episodes "The Flight Of The Jewels” and "The Golden Noose” last night and liked them both.

Despite some lapses in logic, I thought "The Flight Of The Jewels” was an entertaining episode because of the interesting and unusual concept of using the planes. The investigative teamwork was good in this episode; I wish that Truck’s character had been given more to do during this season. I read somewhere that Jack Lord had a major tantrum in this show because Jeff Daniels called him "Mr. Garrett” in one scene during filming. I have to wonder if this was the final scene when he lectured the boys before having Kimo book them, as McGarrett seemed very irritated in this exchange while being even keel for the rest of the episode.

In "The Golden Noose”, the method by which Halloran and his men extract the gold from the bank vault is one of those "only on TV moments”. Still, this episode was made better due to good performances by Irene Yah Ling Sun and Ed Lauter. The Halloran character was especially oily. Actually, the one totally unbelievable part of this episode to me was when McGarrett and Kimo go to the warehouse at the end and overtake four very heavily armed men with only handguns themselves. In earlier season shows, McGarrett would bring half of HPD with him for confrontations such as these. Despite this and the awkwardly staged scene where the bodyguard is run over after pursuing Nadira, I thought the episode was decent and entertaining.

I don’t know why, but it also seemed weird to me when watching the ending credits for "The Flight Of The Jewels” and I saw the copyright date was 1980. I now remember from watching these episodes many years ago how much I detested the leisure suits that not only McGarrett but members of his team wore. This choice of wardrobe seemed to bring a lighter tone to some episodes where they were worn heavily, though certainly not all.

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 16:08:36 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: Raleigh NC

Glenn and H1Forever...thanks for those comments on the GREAT WHITE cd. Right now the only work I have by Stevens is the 5-0 cd so it will be interesting to get another work of his for comparison purposes.

One thought/question regarding last week's ep.....did anyone notice or freeze frame the stunt where McG and the henchman get steamrolled by the black Stang that is driven by Weston? It appeared that the stuntman who was not playing McG (McG (and his stuntman) was in short sleeves so it was easy to determine which was which) came off the roof of the car at a very precarious angle and he smacked the pavement skull-first. Could this have been pulled of with a dummy? ...or a blue-screen?? It certainly looked authentic. It also looked like he got knocked out....for real. Anyone else catch this?

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 10:51:01 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

"Fascinating fact: Sam Melville's character uses the expression "baby" 12 times"

Faaaaaar out!!! Jerry flips me, bay-beee!! Ringfire totally digs the cat! No way, bay-beeee, but NOO WAAAYY!! :!cool:

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 09:40:55 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I think the word in question was "butt," which was in the dirty words list that are censored (this was not a list that was created by me, it's in a file used by the guestbook script used to make the discussion forum). Obviously no one has ever used this word here before. I have removed it, as you can see.

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 09:40:45 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Okay, the last post I wrote should read "handle of the gun", but Mike is * * * as in gun * * * really a bad word to write that it is *** out. That's a dirty word really?

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 09:22:18 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

I watched Season Three's "The Second Shot" from the old show and I enjoyed seeing McGarrett put those cool wraparound 1970 sunglasses that I used to own on during the outdoor scene at the airport when Chin finds the bullet that hit Eric Braeden at the beginning of the show.

One plot hole I found disturbing and I was wondering if anyone had a plausible answer. When McGarrett kills the Greek assassin at the entrance of the hospital as he is walking in with Braeden, after Braeden points the assassin out to McGarrett with "McGarrett, that man!..I've seen him before!"....why does Braeden pick up the killer's gun by the * * * of the weapon when he must know that he will put his fingerprints on the gun, McGarrett will test it for prints, and he will find out that Braeden is not the West German reporter that he claims to be thus exposing the whole plot to kill the exiled Greek doctor. It doesn't make sense. They construct such an intricately plotted assassination attempt only to have McGarrett find out about it by Braeden doing something so stupid. Anybdoy ever wonder about this when they watched this show. When Chin Ho tells McG "the other set of fingerprints aren't Marhlberg" that makes the case fly wide open. Dumb plot point IMHO.

Added: Monday 20 February 2012 07:38:33 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I finished re-anal-yzing Tiger by the Tail:

http://www.mjq.net/fiveo/5-0log1.htm#3

Fascinating fact: Sam Melville's character uses the expression "baby" 12 times ... still less than Tommy Sands in No Blue Skies (17!).

Added: Sunday 19 February 2012 21:38:28 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

I liked that episode, too, especially when Steve and that jury forewoman were deliberating the case, and Steve recreates the crime at Christie's house. The part after the trial, where the forewoman asks him out to lunch and Steve says, "Which old lady would have me?" was priceless. :D

Added: Sunday 19 February 2012 17:29:16 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

That's a good scene. It's worth watching the entire episode just to see it, although the episode is good, too. It's fun watching McGarrett conducting an investigation within the confines of a jury trial.

Added: Sunday 19 February 2012 15:41:52 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

Mike, that picture is from "The Case Against Philip Christie." It's from the last scene where Danno and Duke refer to the boat as an "it," and Steve corrects them and says it's a "she." They laugh at him and Steve tells them to avast. :D

Added: Sunday 19 February 2012 12:28:54 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I found this nice picture of James MacArthur on the subtitle menu of the 11th season DVD set:

http://www.mjq.net/fiveo/pix/season11/SubtitleMenu.jpg

Which episode is this from, though? Looks like they are talking to McGarrett on his "boat"...

Added: Sunday 19 February 2012 12:09:45 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

Those are excellent observations, LB. They are why I personally feel that Season 11 was supposed to have been the final season and that Season 12 was thrust upon them at the last minute. Season 11 pulled out all the stops; whereas, Season 12 barely managed to show up for work.

I had wondered whether Duke's fewer, less interested appearances related to his work as a state senator; however, I see that he held that title in the early 1970s, so that would not apply, after all. But you're right. Something definitely was wrong.

Added: Saturday 18 February 2012 13:05:53 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

The 12th season cover that might have been ... now revealed! Click on the link at the top of the page after BUY DVDS AND STUFF, then go to the bottom of the page where it discusses Season 12

Added: Saturday 18 February 2012 12:53:53 MST


Submitted by: L.B.
From: U.S.A.

Last night, I watched S12 episodes "Who Says Cops Don’t Cry” and "Good Help Is Hard To Find”. I found both of these episodes to be entertaining and noticed some patterns developing in them after also watching "A Lion In The Streets” earlier in the week.

It certainly appears that McGarrett is slowing down in this final season and displays some different character traits from earlier seasons. He had to have mellowed a lot to offer a Lori a job after she totally disrespected Five-O’s investigation into her husband’s death and was clearly bent on revenge more than anything else. He also offers Kimo a job despite concerns over his methods and questionable past as a law officer. McGarrett really shows his age in action scenes, like where he is chasing after Marioni and Kimo on the beach in "Good Help Is Hard To Find”. And as I mentioned in an earlier post, he appears less in these episodes than he did in the seasons before, mainly at critical story points. It is almost as if he has announced his retirement in advance and has decided to hand off more responsibility to his employees for the team to be ready for that time.

The writers also erred in my view by having both Kimo and Lori play cops grieving from the loss of a spouse. While it created initial sympathy for the characters, it would lead to a letdown in those characters performances once those murders were avenged. How could Sharon Farrell ever give a better performance in succeeding episodes where she’s just doing typical police work? And once Marioni was killed, Kimo could just as well have headed back to Boston. Isn’t that the only reason he ever came to Hawaii?

As I continue to watch the S12 episodes for the first time in many years, I have to wonder just what being on that set was like as the season progressed. I still remember in later episodes that Smith didn’t appear to want to be there, and from what I read Farrell was let go, so she couldn’t have been happy either. Duke appeared to be somewhat surly in some of his scenes, which was understandable given his reduced role and having to take orders from the newcomers. Lord didn’t seem to be as inspired in his performances as in prior years, which is definitely an eye opener.

Added: Saturday 18 February 2012 12:23:41 MST


Submitted by: Barbara
From: CHICAGO

I know the gal who wrote the aforementioned piece that Peter Lenkov tweeted. Really nice article written by a very funny, pretty, vivacious woman. Catherine and I met when we both had last minute opportunities to go to Hawaii last September for the HF0 season 2 premiere at Sunset on the Beach. Aloha Travel planned four days of special Hawaii Five-0 activities for a group of about 40 or 50 and we had the time of our lives. Even ended up in the first row of fans (10,000 strong) at the end of the red carpet. Met many wonderful folks there and we plan to go back again in September. Anyone care to join us?

Added: Saturday 18 February 2012 11:15:48 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Awww…

(Obviously Lenkov loves this story, he tweeted it.)

http://h50show.wordpress.com/2012/02/18/my-relationship-with-hawaii-five-0/

Added: Saturday 18 February 2012 10:25:23 MST


Submitted by: Glenn
From: Orlando, FL (USA)

Big H,

Yes, ACT OF PIRACY/THE GREAT WHITE is a great CD - WELL WORTH the discounted price (or full price) over at SAE.

I purchased two copies back in 1991, direct from the Prometheus label - it is, indeed, great Morton Stevens.

Also, don't forget Stevens' ONE MAN JURY and now HARDLY WORKING CD's from Buysoundtrax.com.

I'm SO happy to see these Mort titles coming out - we just need those darn FIVE-0 scores released. In the meantime, there is the recently released POLICE WOMAN - THE COMPLETE SECOND SEASON that does feature additional Morton Stevens' scores for some of the episodes - I already receive my copy...:)

Added: Friday 17 February 2012 14:37:41 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

I own the "Act of Piracy / Great White" CD, and I thoroughly enjoy it. It's delightfully Morton Stevens, so much so that I can see those pirates and that shark even while I listen to the music. Try it. You'll like it.

Added: Friday 17 February 2012 13:21:10 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: Raleigh, NC

Can anyone here give a review/recommendation on the ACT OF PIRACY/GREAT WHITE cd? Seems like someone mentioned it sometime last year....was it you, Glenn?

Added: Friday 17 February 2012 10:55:53 MST


Submitted by: Bill
From: Palm Beach County Florida

The copying of wikipedia by other websites I'm quite aware of. Did you know Former Supreme Court Justices copy from Wikipedia too. US Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens recently published a book titled 'Five Chiefs', in it he wrote that former Chief Justice Harlan F. Stone died while an opinion was being read from the bench.

This is untrue. Stone died of stroke at his home. That according to articles written in 1946(when Stone died) which can be found via a google news search just like the one done for Bannen. Where did Stevens get his wrong info? From 2008-12, the wikipedia article on Stone said he died while an opinion was being read from the bench. The article has been fixed. Stevens book remains incorrect.

Added: Friday 17 February 2012 11:18:25 MST


Submitted by: Bill
From: Palm Beach County Florida

Ian Bannen's Five-0 claim could well be nonsense because in the very article he claims to have won an Oscar for Flight of the Phoenix. He was nominated, but didn't win.

Mr. Mike comments: This is quite possible, because the Wikipedia entry is unsubstantiated, without any references. If you do a search for Ian Bannen Hawaii Five-O in Google, you will get tons of references, all of which are basically parroting the same thing. Some of them don't say he was under consideration for >the< lead in Five-O, but just >a< lead.

Added: Friday 17 February 2012 08:02:22 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Some links:

Article about passing of Mel Kinney (kid from the original Five-O titles) from Honolulu Star-Advertiser bit.ly/xgR46A

Al Harrington is in next Monday's show: http://twitpic.com/8ka7j0

I recently revised my anal-ysis of season one's show No Blue Skies: http://www.mjq.net/fiveo/5-0log1.htm#8

Added: Friday 17 February 2012 05:59:35 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I was looking up the Scottish actor Ian Bannen recently because I got a copy of the film "The Offence," starring him and Sean Connery (a superb film). When I looked up Bannen at Wikipedia, it said that he had been considered for the lead role in the original Five-O. The following newspaper article refers to this:

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1798&dat=19810602&id=-QEdAAAAIBAJ&sjid=244EAAAAIBAJ&pg=4142,213542

Added: Thursday 16 February 2012 17:26:17 MST


Submitted by: otto mannix
From: nyc

Looks like the FBI episode with Lord is the eighth out of twenty-six, so you're probably right about its being in the first box. I've never seen a single episode of that show.

Watched 6,000 Deadly Tickets last night. The bombing of the travel agency and the aftermath tableaux are a high-budget spectacular! The ending is also really good with the dudes trying to escape by boat. Good episode!

Added: Thursday 16 February 2012 16:59:37 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Warner Archive has released season two of The FBI, including the episode which stars Jack Lord. I think the first set is the one which contains the Lord episode, but don't take my word for it!

http://www.wbshop.com/Warner-Archive/ARCHIVE,default,sc.html

Screen Archives Entertainment is selling Act of Piracy/The Great White, a CD containing two scores by Morton Stevens at a reduced price:

http://www.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/1557/ACT-OF-PIRACY-THE-GREAT-WHITE/

Added: Thursday 16 February 2012 16:04:13 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

I'm sorry to hear that, Tim. My condolences to you and Mel's family and friends. May he rest in peace.

Added: Wednesday 15 February 2012 11:44:43 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: Raleigh, NC

"Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't it Gary Cooper who mentored a young Jack? We all know that Jack idolized Coop and that Coop helped to break Jack into showbiz."

That would make sense, Ringfire, since Coop showed Lord how to take an @$$-whipping in "Man of the West." LOL, actually, it was probably Coop's stand-in that did that fight scene, since Coop was notorious for having bad back pain.

Added: Wednesday 15 February 2012 10:56:39 MST


Submitted by: Tim
From: Honolulu

Sad day yesterday. Mel Kinney, the little boy in the opening of the original series passed away of a heart attack. He was 55 years old. He had the heart attach a week ago after surfing on the North Shore. He was at Queen’s Hospital for a week before he passed. He was my neighbor and we will miss him dearly. :!cry:

Added: Wednesday 15 February 2012 10:55:14 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

To LB: Good notes, well thought out and giving food for thought.

Added: Wednesday 15 February 2012 03:18:52 MST


Submitted by: Dan A
From: South Brunswick NJ

Jim Gardner on WPVI (ABC) in Philladelphia has been a anchor on the station since 1976 and the lead anchor since 1977. Here in Centarl NJ i am able to watch both him and WNBC's Chuck Scarborough on my Cable.

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 20:44:16 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

"No mention of JL insisting that Moore eat prunes or use the back of old scrpits as scratch paper?" - Rick

That only tells you how ludicrous those stories are, Rick.

Here, Moore has only nice things to say about Jack, and nothing to indicate he was the nut Sharon Farrell made him out to be.

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 17:35:57 MST


Submitted by: L.B.
From: U.S.A.

I just received the 12th season DVD this past weekend and watched "A Lion In The Streets”. This was an excellent episode, elevated by the performances of Paul L. Smith and William Smith in their respective roles. It was great to see both of them have turns at intimidating Tony Alika after knocking out his henchmen. The irony is that neither Mio or Kamoku would have been good choices for the office they were seeking, with Mio’s ties to Alika and Kamoku’s hot temper. There were a couple of things that I noticed about William Smith’s Carew character that I wanted to mention.

First, while his performance in this episode was great, I can see how that Smith’s performance would decline in future episodes (his dislike of working with Jack Lord notwithstanding). Smith was always a presence on screen (mostly as villains), and his part in this episode allowed him to take advantage of that. By being a cop who wasn’t working for McGarrett yet, he was able to confront Steve in a way that he could not once he joined the team later on. He was also able to conduct police business more his way, as seen in his intimidation of Alika on the beach. Five-O’s detectives over the years generally carried out their duties with little emotion or fanfare. That type of role did not suit Smith’s talents well in my view, based on the roles he had played up to this point. This is not to say that he was a better actor than say, James MacArthur, but it had to be a disappointment to see him reduced to more of an average team member after his performance in this episode. It should also be noted that Sharon Farrell played the part of a grieving and vengeful cop well in the next episode, but her character later suffered under the same limitations as Smith’s did.

Second, the theory that Lord had planned to turn the series over to Smith and Farrell at some point is given some credence in this episode (although I still don’t believe that). While the curse placed on him in the episode was partly responsible, McGarrett resembles Barnaby Jones in this episode, in that he appears mainly at critical points in the story and the show focuses more on the guest stars. It seemed like Lord was giving others (most notably W. Smith) a chance to audition here. Given his performance, I believe Smith could have played a cop successfully, but not as a successor to McGarrett in Five-O. Smith’s intimidating manner would have likely grown tiresome fairly quickly in the top job, and Farrell’s performances in future episodes weren’t exceptional outside of "Who Says Cops Don’t Cry”. Also, if CBS wanted Smith and Farrell to play cops, why not give them a new show instead of one that was nearing the end? Furthermore, I read years ago where Lord did not plan to be involved with M Station: Hawaii (pilot) on a daily basis even if it had become a series, indicating that he was probably just looking forward to retirement with Marie rather than being involved with another series. Thus, I can’t see how this plan would have worked out, even if it appeared in this episode like they were pursuing it somewhat.

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 16:20:45 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

oh well
bye lori :!cry:

we'll miss you

as for the episode---another Meh!

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 12:43:12 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Another long-serving TV newscaster is Canada's Lloyd Robertson (news career from 1954 to 2011, still active in broadcasting). According to his Wikipedia page, he is one of the longest-serving news anchors on English-language North American television (network or local) along with KTRK-TV (Houston)'s Dave Ward, WNBC (New York)'s Chuck Scarborough and KING-TV (Seattle)'s Jean Enersen. And yes, he was the "inspiration" for Joe Flaherty's news broadcaster Floyd Robertson. (Eugene Levy's Earl Camembert was named after another Canadian announcer, Earl Cameron.)

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 11:30:46 MST


Submitted by: Bill K.
From: Detroit area

///I thought FRED VOX was the longest running anchor.////

It would be funny to imagine the field day Fred Vox would have with the new Five-0 crew.

"And who is this King McGarrett, this tattooed menace to citizens? What rules does he follow? I'll tell you! King McGarrett's rules!"

"Did you see that one of King McGarrett's men, one Chin Ho Kelly, deliberately ram the gate of a diplomatic facility? This could have been the start of an international incident!"

"I am mad! I am angry! And I promise to push this -- all the way to the top!"

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 11:21:04 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Since the show's producers seemingly read this guestbook, and they may( or may not) be interested in filling the character openings that they now have, may I strongly suggest this hire for them. There is an Australian actress by the name of Tabrett Bethell who is an extremely good actress, and can do wonderful things with deep emotional roles. If you give her a meaty, important, powerful role on the new Five-O, you will be amazed with the things that she can bring to the character. She's also absolutely gorgeous, and had a starring role on the ABC syndicated series "Legend of the Seeker." If you give her a meaty role and bring her aboard, you'll see your ratings go up and you'll have someone who will rocket to overnight stardom. She's a tremendous professional as well, and since she's not well known yet, she will not ask for an outrageous salary. If they bring her on board she'll make Grace Park feel like she will need to scream to get attention. No, I'm not her agent, but she can act. Her face can convey so much emotion seemingly effortlessly. Hire her!

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 10:29:21 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

For me the best part of last night' s show was the featuring of the University's of Hawaii's football team- the warriors- which was mentioned often during the show, although I find Danno's comment "they remind me of my beloved Jets" a little dubious as their uniforms are not even close. The color green that they share is completely different.

As for the show, I agree with everything Mr. Mike said, and they did do nothing with the Lori character, so I agree it was a waste, but I thought the actress who played Lori was very attractive. If they had her and Steve get it on, I wouldn't have minded, as it might have given some much needed life to the show. They totally destroyed the spirit of the original series anyway, so I really didn't care what or who was in Steve's love life.

To the actress that played Lori:( I guess her name was Lauren Germane)since you now have some free time on your hands- Call me babe!...You are welcome on my island anytime! ;)

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 09:01:08 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

On IMDB, my comment re last night's show:

The producers of the show totally blew it with the Lori character. She could have been interesting -- squealing to the Governor, caught between two worlds, etc. -- but what we got was NOTHING. Even the line she gave McGarrett near the end -- "I let things slide because of my feelings for you" -- was a lame, final "stick it to the Lori haters."

"ceil1"'s reply:

I think there was a bit of stick it to the lori haters in that scene - not just in showing that Lori had the hots for Steve but also the "we'll miss you won't be the same without you" speech Steve gives her.

I do wonder how the other actors feel about a fan rebellion having the power to get an actor fired - not so sure if I was AOL or any of the others that I would feel so happy about this.

There was a lot of implausible stuff in this episode - which is of course par for this show - all in all though it sure does signal a return to the core four, nice team togetherness moments etc. Very welcome. But the idea that Steve could just decide on his own to do his reserve training (utterly absurd) or that as a Spec War reservists he would go on a carrier, or that Catherine is forever on the Enterprise (which in the real world is home based in Norfolk Va.) or that given the very severe penalties for fraternization on a carrier or between a superior officer and a lower ranking officer in the same command - whole thing was nutty. I see it as an attempt to totally reassure the viewers who have been so vocal about their love for Catherine as opposed to Lori. I'd bet though if Catherine figured too much in Steve's life - the knives would come out for her too from some fans. Safer for her to be sent far away with infrequent contact.

Added: Tuesday 14 February 2012 08:09:53 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

ringfire, I thought the same thing when I read that. I think you're right. I think he meant to say Cary Cooper.

No mention of JL insisting that Moore eat prunes or use the back of old scrpits as scratch paper?

Added: Monday 13 February 2012 17:36:06 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

You're right, Ringfire. It was Gary Cooper.

Added: Monday 13 February 2012 17:03:04 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

another great tv theme:
INSPECTOR MORSE that was seen on PBS
the famous "Morse Code" theme http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PD9Yvd7pFus

the series spun off INSPECTOR LEWIS and this summer on PBS , ENDEAVOUR (his 1st name) about a young Morse

can't wait

belongs in my top 10 best crime drama themes of all time.

Added: Monday 13 February 2012 16:12:12 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

"When I thanked him in later years for all his help, he said John Wayne had done the same thing for him."

From the Joe Moore interview posted below. Correct me if I'm wrong but wasn't it Gary Cooper who mentored a young Jack? We all know that Jack idolized Coop and that Coop helped to break Jack into showbiz. They even appeared in a few films together. Maybe Moore meant Cooper, not Wayne. I've never heard of any connections between Lord and the Duke.

Added: Monday 13 February 2012 14:28:03 MST


Submitted by: otto
From: nyc

I thought FRED VOX was the longest running anchor.

Added: Monday 13 February 2012 07:07:14 MST


Submitted by: Ben Masters
From: Fountain Inn, SC

WRT that thing about the longest-serving news anchor, I think that Dave Ward of KTRK in Houston, TX may be the longest: he's been there since 1966.

Added: Monday 13 February 2012 04:27:59 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

Here's a Folgers Coffee Commercial from the early sixties with Tim O'Kelley (Danno from the pilot):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRYfouuHPvs&feature=endscreen&NR=1

Added: Sunday 12 February 2012 17:14:13 MST


Submitted by: Just a Fan
From: Chicago area

Just finished watching Season 7 "Bones of Contention". I noticed a goof not mentioned on the "goofs" page. The marker from the switched grave says the soldier died in 1945. How could he have ribbons from the Korean War, which wouldn't start for another 5 years?

Added: Sunday 12 February 2012 17:06:24 MST


Submitted by: Maxine
From: Brooklyn

I'm finally getting around to watching Season 11's two-part finale, "Year of the Horse." I keep getting distracted by the fact that George Lazenby's character looks exactly like Guy Caballero from SCTV, as played by Joe Flaherty.

Added: Sunday 12 February 2012 10:13:25 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: N.J.

Ed, thank you for that interview. It's interesting to note that Jack mentioned to Joe that there would be two final seasons of the show, rather than one. If they were going to go into a thirteenth season, they'd have to make a drastic improvement in the storylines, and do something with the cast. One more season of Kimo and Truck's antics would be too much.

Added: Saturday 11 February 2012 13:09:48 MST


Submitted by: Dan Asnis
From: South Brunswick

"Today he is the longest-serving news anchor at one station in the country." The writer of the story does not have his facts correct. For one off the top of my head Chuck Scarborough has been one the main News achors on WNBC in New York since 1974.

Added: Friday 10 February 2012 22:47:39 MST


Submitted by: Steve's Girl
From: Germany

Thank you, Ed and Mr. Mike, for posting the article about John Moore.

Added: Friday 10 February 2012 22:12:26 MST


Submitted by: Ed
From: Honolulu

KHON's Joe Moore declined chance to be a 'Five-0' star

Which TV newsman was almost hired when James MacArthur decided to retire from "Hawaii Five-0"?

Most "Hawaii Five-0" fans know that MacArthur decided not to return for a 12th season of the groundbreaking crime series set in Hawaii.

Few know that the person asked to replace him in the cast was none other than Joe Moore, who had guest-starred in 11 episodes at that point.

"Following the 11th season," Moore recalls, "Jack Lord called and asked me to lunch at his Kahala apartment. I'd had several dinners with him over the years, and we got along really well. He told me about MacArthur leaving and said he was gearing up for what he expected to be the show's final two seasons.

"Jack told me how much he'd enjoyed having me guest on the show in past seasons and said that not only as the star of the show, but also as executive producer, he'd like me to join the ‘Five-0' team as a new character.

"Jack's idea was that I would play a young police officer that he'd picked from HPD to join ‘Five-0.' I would do a lot of the action scenes that Jack felt he was getting a little too old for. I was 31 then," Moore continues.

At the time, Moore was a sportscaster at KHON. "Obviously, it was an extremely flattering and tempting offer, but it came just as KHON was asking me to switch from sportscaster to the news anchor job. I've always enjoyed acting, but also realized the chances of being a successful full-time actor are slim."

Jack made the offer on a Friday and told Moore to think about it over the weekend. "I got back to him on Monday morning and said it was a hard decision, but I was going to stay in the news business. Jack's was an offer I couldn't refuse … but did.

"I told him I hoped I could still guest on ‘Five-0.' He said, of course, and it wasn't long after that I did the role of the astrology-loving boxer in ‘Sign of the Ram.'"

How did Moore first get on the show? "I went to the local casting director, Ted Thorpe, in the third season and read for him. He said I was acting for the stage, not acting for TV, and needed to take some lessons. I sought out Glenn Cannon at the University of Hawaii and had a few sessions with him. That got me out of overprojecting and into speaking naturally for the camera.

"Then early in the fourth season, Lord, who was a fan of my nightly sportscasts, called me at the station and said he'd like me to play the part of an Army captain in an upcoming episode (‘Skinhead' — 1972). That was my first role. I wound up doing 12 episodes during the run of the series."

Moore says his favorite episodes were "Sign of the Ram" (1979), in which he played a boxer, and "Dealer's Choice Is Blackmail" (1977), in which he played John Ritter's boss as owner of a small interisland plane company.

"I also enjoyed ‘You Don't See Many Pirates These Days' (1977), where I played the assistant of an international crook played by Rossano Brazzi, and ‘The Case Against Philip Christie' (1978), a mystery where I played a murderer, but viewers didn't know it until the end of the episode."

Moore says his friendship with Jack Lord began in 1972. "The first day working on the ‘Skinhead' episode, we filmed a scene together in the morning. Jack invited me into his trailer for lunch, and something between us clicked."

"We had a great conversation, and that started a long friendship and his mentoring of me as an actor. When I thanked him in later years for all his help, he said John Wayne had done the same thing for him."

Lord coached Moore in a lot of technical tricks of the trade, such as which eye of your fellow actor to focus on during a close-up (the eye closer to the camera), how to position your body in relation to the camera for greatest effect (depends on what you're trying to achieve), how to prepare your eyes when doing a close-up in bright sunlight (close eyes, tilt head toward sun until just before ready to shoot) and "being in the moment."

Joe Moore probably made the right decision. Today he is the longest-serving news anchor at one station in the country. He has also been able to guest-star in many island-based network series filmed here, as well as many stage appearances.

What does Moore think of the remake of "Five-0"? "I like it," he says. "But since it's set in the present day, I wish they'd come up with a new cast of characters perhaps led by Jake McGarrett, Steve's nephew."

Added: Friday 10 February 2012 18:53:52 MST


Submitted by: Ed
From: Honolulu

Sorry Mike,
I forgot that they charge a fee for access now. I pay $10 for an entire year which is not too bad. If you like, I can copy the article to the forum.

Ed

Mr. Mike comments: Sure, or just send it to me by e-mail via the link at the bottom of the page...

Added: Friday 10 February 2012 15:56:29 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

terry o'quinn will mentor noah wyle in the new season of TNT'S FALLING SKIES

Added: Friday 10 February 2012 14:38:34 MST


Submitted by: Ed
From: Honolulu

Interesting article about how Joe Moore was offered the role of James McArthur's replacement in today's Star-Advertiser. http://bit.ly/wA5SQ1

Ed

Mr. Mike comments: Isn't there a way to read this article without either having to pay money or create an account/log in? The article was posted TODAY, I don't understand why these people are so greedy already.

Added: Friday 10 February 2012 09:04:32 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

add another cutie to the sexiest 5-0 gals old and new shows: the lovely screaming Hawaiian Airlines stewardess!

Added: Thursday 09 February 2012 15:20:37 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

Peter Greene was also in the pilot of the FX show JUSTIFIED and he gets blown away by raylan givens w/in the 1st few mins

and check this out

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4pPKiavZ-r8

Hell's Kitchen! my area! i agree with greene saying about the Kitchen now , not the same

Added: Thursday 09 February 2012 14:55:13 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Comment e-mailed to me by Fred:

On the last episode synopsis, you mentioned the Diamond Head shooting location used was similar to the one on the old series. It was the same location. And I would estimate that they used that area about a dozen or more times over the old series. Just around the bend on that road is a secondary tunnel entrance to the Diamond Head Crater. That tunnel was used in one of your favorite episodes "Hookman" and also "For A Million - Why Not?". That area we saw on the last show was used in "A Thousand Pardons -- You're Dead!" as well as "Thanks for the Honeymoon" and "Loose Ends Get Hit" (where Sandy gets Vanden Ecker to flip the car). It's used in many others, but I can't think of any more off hand. Also, just down the hillside of that site, is the house that is used in "Nightmare in Blue". "Nightmare in Blue" is also shot slightly down the road of the tunnel where Elissa Dulce is staking out the rapist in the supposed broken down car. I'm sure you know that shoot location was within a short walking distance of their sound stage at Fort Ruger.

Added: Thursday 09 February 2012 07:04:10 MST


Submitted by: Big Chicken
From: Outside The Box

The Rainbow Warrior say: ‘My favorite lines from "Trouble in Mind” is when McGarrett says "In your business, Harry, your best friends are your worst enemies." to the dope pusher.’

Had forgotten that one, man. Hafta add that to my list of fave McGarrett-isms. ;) "Trouble Mind” such a stellar episode and S3 be a juggernaut of a season - most def. Agree with your insights about the window into Wo fat in ‘Time 2 Die’ as well, Rainbow Warrior

I love that S3 ep where they kidnap Kono & McGarrett totally played those kidnappers. It just showed what a tight, crack outfit the Five-O was, that these kidnapas be totally outta they league. They most definetly not up to messin with McG. Anyways, good to here yo thoughts on that awesome 3rd season of the Five-O, brudda.

N lastly - a shout outs to Mr Hiram in NYC. 'Clean Shaven' an awesome, unheralded 90s indie flick and Pete Greene's da man! INDeeD

Added: Wednesday 08 February 2012 22:14:55 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

i did see NCIS 200
thought it was a B+
i enjoy mike with gibbs, probie!

where was Kort?

i thought for a moment, julia roberts played gibbs' mom. NCIS keeps winning in the ratings! amazing on season 7 and beyond, it finally reaches #1 and it is still strong!

(sorry mike for NCIS talk)

peter greene is a great actor, first saw him in the 1993 film CLEAN, SHAVEN as a schizophrenic looking for his daughter while hunted by a private eye. a very haunting film and an exhausting 80 mins. check it out ; it is very hard to watch.

got a clip
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_K97n1wA9o

the 4:12 mark...Wow! and that score

Added: Wednesday 08 February 2012 15:18:43 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Here is an interesting comment posted at IMDB by kittywriter9 about Five-0 in light of fears that the dropping ratings will cause it harm:

You need 88 episodes for full syndication which would mean four series. HFO has around five dramas doing worse than it on CBS so no immediate worries. However yeah cause for concern. But it does have a very lucrative syndication deal and it is an in house production, which means that syndication deal is worth a hell of a lot more to CBS than say the one they've got for The Mentalist.

The demo held up well though and a 2.7 is still very good for the ten pm hour. As people have been saying over on TVBTN's Smash really didn't dent HFO much it could have been a lot worse.

Smash had over 30 million dollars spent on its promotion, the most of any tv show ever. CBS will be more than aware of this. No other CBS ten pm show has to face anything like the competition that HFO got from Smash. When I first saw the overnights for Smash I honestly thought we'd be down in the low two's! I was sick, so was kind of happy with the 2.7

Sweeps aren't as relevant anymore for national markets and they aren't used as much to set national ad rates, they're really more relevant now for local markets so not as big a deal.

Barring an absolute disaster we'll get a next season but then Lenkov needs to tighten it up! Big time! No more over filling of characters, no more jumbled plots, no more Lori. The show looks good, it has a great cast, great action, great theme tune, great production values, the issue is the writing. If they can pull that around then great, if not it might be a three season show.

I'm hoping lenkov can turn it around, mainly for the sake of Alex and Scott who I think are awesome in their roles. It sickens me when you see great shows ruined by bad writing. (I'm thinking Heroes right now).

Added: Wednesday 08 February 2012 06:00:10 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

Hiram, I watched the NCIS 200th episode last night and was disappointed. It came across like a poor remake of the episode "Infinity and Jelly Donuts" on "Magnum, PI." Magnum and McReynolds were better than Gibbs and Mike Franks, but the original is always better than the remake. Where have we heard that before???

Added: Wednesday 08 February 2012 05:39:11 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Very interesting Five-0 site:

http://h50sardonic.com/

Added: Wednesday 08 February 2012 05:29:30 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

i will see it this week CBS on Demand

missed it last nite, 1st one i missed since the general pak one last year

i was very tired

zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

gonna watch NCIS 200th episode tonite

Added: Tuesday 07 February 2012 13:06:12 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Yeah, I was thinking the same thing about that. Danno has to answer for the two shootings, and Peterson gave up Danno's daughter way too easily. Probably should have been a two part episode where they could have fleshed everything out and tied up loose ends.

The second part could have been Five-O trying to force Peterson to give up the location of Danno's daughter and he refuses because he wants Danny to suffer, so they have to hunt for her all over Hawaii while they keep working on Peterson.

Added: Tuesday 07 February 2012 10:44:45 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I think the positives would give it at least three stars...

But, there is more food for thought...

Danno shoots his ex-wife's husband, even though it is supposedly not a serious wound. Then he shoots Peterson (the bad guy) in the leg. Isn't he going to be held accountable for either of these actions? I really wonder why, after all this, Peterson tells Danno where his daughter is being held. Why should he? Obviously the guy has nothing to gain, considering what a dirtbag he has been!

Added: Tuesday 07 February 2012 10:11:55 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

You know, Mr. Mike I really liked last night's show and thought, like you did, that it had a really good ending after Grace( Danny's daughter) was rescued. What do you think?....... am I right was it one of the better new Five-O's or am I wrong that I'm overrating it?

Added: Tuesday 07 February 2012 09:10:46 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

It was pretty obvious from the first show when we knew that Danny had a young daughter that some episode would put her in serious danger and last night’s was the one, big time.

Things that annoyed me:

- At the beginning, Collins, Danno’s old pal, goes to the washroom as the flight attendant, seemingly only a few feet away, is coming down the aisle picking up paperwork from people. So when does Peterson go into the washroom and kill him? If he went right away, wouldn’t the FA notice something odd (like two guys going into the same can)? If he did it later, wouldn’t this have given Collins enough time to contact Danno? Painter (the extradited convict) later says that Peterson let him free from the ankle bracelets after the murder happened. The way the FA is coming down the aisle to pick up the paperwork and then coming down the aisle to tell people to put their seat belts on prior to the plane landing looks like this is the same sequence. Bad editing!

- Peterson and Painter escape through the rear of the plane. Is this really possible? (I know nothing about the topography of the inside of the rear of a commercial airplane.)

- Peterson is some kind of computer whiz, tapping into Danno’s and Rachel’s voice mail. And he "clones” Danno’s cel phone so he can determine calls being made to and from the phone. Puh-leeze!

- If Five-O pulls up "McGuire’s” (i.e., Peterson’s) driver’s license, why does it take them so long to find out the guy was actually dead and that Peterson had stolen his identity?

- When McGarrett goes into Peterson’s computer, why do the pictures of Danno, Rachel and Gracie suddenly propagate all over the screen? How conveeenient…

The good stuff:

- Super intense performance by Caan. He should get prizes for this for sure! Peter Green as the bad guy Peterson oozed nastiness … perhaps the nastiest character yet seen on the show.

- Excellent photography (helped in no small part by the beautiful weather).

- I loved the business at the beginning with McGarrett and Lori … this already has the Lori haters frothing at the mouth.

- There was no sucky ending at the very end after Gracie was rescued. Why didn’t Teilor Grubbs get a credit at the beginning of the show?

- The location where Danno pulled up near Diamond Head briefly looked similar to one in the old show used in more than one episode (i.e., A Thousand Pardons -- You're Dead).

The guy playing the president of Hawaiian Airlines really >is< the president of Hawaiian Airlines, by the way…

Added: Tuesday 07 February 2012 00:15:04 MST


Submitted by: otto
From: nyc

HA HA, of course! thanks MJQ and Da Big! It was so obvious that i couldn't see it, like looking over and over for something on your desk and it's directly in front of you!!! This morning i saw Philip Pine (the lawyer) on an episode of THE OUTER LIMITS.

Added: Monday 06 February 2012 10:17:13 MST


Submitted by: Da Big Office
From: TX

Otto, you're thinking of the very first episode, "Full Fathom Five." Yes, the wealthy hippie and her conservator, Pepe, are very funny.

Added: Monday 06 February 2012 09:27:33 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Episode #1.

Added: Monday 06 February 2012 09:00:50 MST


Submitted by: otto
From: nyc

I'm trying to remember which episode has a scene where a woman is missing, and the family lawyer is searching for her. He and McG find her on a beach with some hippies, one of whom keeps playing a guitar, and she refuses to come with the lawyer and claim her share of the family money. It's a funny scene, but i'm wracking my brain trying to remember WHICH EPISODE? Can anyone help?

Added: Monday 06 February 2012 08:53:44 MST


Submitted by: Rick
From: Newport Beach

Interesting Wikipedia page on Nancy Wilson. She appears to be a bit unconventional, living for some time in Pioneertown, CA. Check it out on Google earth.

Agree with RW, it's a classic ep all the way and as Maxine said, the heroin thing? ...that's fuzz jive.

Added: Saturday 04 February 2012 12:53:50 MST


Submitted by: Maxine
From: Brooklyn

Nancy Wilson: she sang a unique blend of jazz & pop, kind of supper club-type material, and had a number of records in this vein on the charts in the 1960s when she was in her 20s and early 30s. Subsequently it seems she veered more into straight jazz, for which she's won Grammy awards. As far as I know she has never had a heroin problem like her Five-O character.

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 23:50:56 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

jack lord in SUSPENSE THEATER 1965: THE RAVINE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-k4UZTrmqf4

it was shown on Antenna TV a while back but SUSPENSE is on 3am fri/sat's

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 15:30:01 MST


Submitted by: Mr Hiram
From: NYC

enjoy the Super Bowl
GIANTS 26 PATS 23
my score
and monday 5-0 vs CASTLE vs NBC'S new SMASH which i saw online and it is so so. my neighborhood diner will be seen on SMASH but not on 1st show.

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 15:24:04 MST


Submitted by: otto
From: nyc

Recent Five-O alumni sightings. James Hong in an episode of 1950s sitcom BACHELOR FATHER, Harold Gould as the school principle in DENNIS THE MENACE. Elliot Street (Judy Moon stalker) in a movie called THE HARROD EXPERIMENT.

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 15:20:03 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Peter Lenkov answers questions about Hawaii Five-0's season two: http://bit.ly/ynzXX0

- A big confrontation with Wo Fat is coming up (never woulda thunk it!)
- A relationship from Kono's past will return
- James Caan will NOT play Danno's father
- women like to see O'Loughlin shirtless
- regarding the Subway ad, product integration is a fact of life

I am not too crazy about what he says about returning-from-the-original-series Ed Asner character's reintegration into society (and the show):

We are not going to show any of the old characters. We’re only showing footage of Ed and we are using that as a flashback device. The only tie is that we are saying that the person who drove Ed Asner to jail when he was arrested was a young cop named John McGarrett — so he’s the father — and that Ed tried to bribe him on the way to jail that day and the father wouldn’t take the bribe. Shows you what kind of man he was. And that’s the only connection to anything with McGarrett’s past. (This seems to violate the Five-O space/time continuum big time!)

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 12:53:48 MST


Submitted by: Glenn
From: Orlando, FL (USA)

For all you Morton Stevens fans, here is a link to a delightful score that Mort did for Jerry Lewis that has just been released - I already ordered my copy - enjoy:

http://bit.ly/zMN7dR

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 11:26:25 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

I started watching season three of the old show on the DVD box set which many people consider the best season of the 12, and so far it appears to be that way. Touching briefly on "...a Time To Die"...I loved the way that they started to flesh out the Wo Fat character and provide a complexity to him. When he chokes up recalling the death of his daughter in the Revolution, and as he plays chess with the doctor's kidnapped daughter he says "I don't always enjoy winning" with a taste of sadness, it shows the prime example of the success of the old show. The villians were the equal of McGarrett and just as interesting, so when their plots were ruined, or they were nabbed it was very satisfying. Also, because of the tensions that still exist today between China and the USA, the plot line of Wo Fat and McGarrett holds up all these years later. I always thought the new show made a huge mistake with the baloney of making him a Japanese Yakuza member or whatever the storyline is now. I know they want to have their own identity and be different, but they should have kept him a Red Chinese agent and did what the old show did and only bring him back twice a year for special episodes. The new show having Wo Fat in every episode is getting tiring, and ruining a good thing. Wo Fat was special in the old show because he did't appear that often and when he did it was special.

Now, "Trouble in Mind." Great show, I don't know anything about Nancy Wilson the singer/actress. Very pretty woman, great voice. Can anybody tell me the highlights of her life and career? Big Chicken: my favorite lines from this episode is when McGarrett says "In your business, Harry, your best friends are your worst enemies." to the dope pusher, and when McGarrett tells Michael's contact in the bar to sit down and the guy says "Who are you?" McG flashes his badge and says "McGarrett,Hawaii Five-O" and Mike's contact says "You have some groovy friends baby."

Terrific episode with a chilling scene with the nine year boy who is a heroin addict.

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 10:28:39 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Here and there...

Congratulations, Jimmy! Way to go! Goodness knows 1.0 wouldn't have been the same without you.

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 10:22:52 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

From Jimmy Borges' Facebook page:

Peter Lenkov, Producer, told me about a year ago that he wanted to write me into one of the episodes. Last week, I got a call to come in and look at some dialogue and take some camera shots. It seems that all went well on both sides and I'll be shooting a nice part that could be a recurring part. My big excitement is ... I'm shooting with Alex O'Loughlin, Scott Caan and ... TAH RAH ... JAMES CAAN. He's one of my favorite actors! We get to bang heads (dialogue-wise). We shoot next week. Thank you, Peter Lenkov, Thank you Rachel (for the hot read) ... JAMES CAAN ... YAY.

Added: Friday 03 February 2012 07:46:55 MST


Submitted by: otto
From: nyc

Big H: Thanks for that. Man, the Lord was kickin' * * * in that episode of Combat. He seems to have one acting style: Climbing up that hill !!! Good stuff.

Added: Thursday 02 February 2012 06:35:13 MST


Submitted by: AJ
From: NY

最後のシーズンを終えたし、私は、それは、以前のシーズンよりも優れているとまだ思います。

Added: Wednesday 01 February 2012 22:28:24 MST


Submitted by: Big H
From: rawleee, n ceee

"HEY, in all the maelstrom of these scintillating conversations, have we lost our love for Vic Morrow in TWO DOVES AND MR. HERON??? What a weird character. Good performance.

Otto...your comment got me to thinking about Morrow and the type of characters he used to play...usually strong forceful types, albeit in TWO DOVES he was more like... a dove. So here's some more love for Morrow (a little fireworks between he and Lord) http://bit.ly/wF1sxy

Kind of ironic that Lords says at the end of this vid>>> "That's a cheap "cop-out!"

Added: Wednesday 01 February 2012 10:55:10 MST


Links back: Main PageDiscussion Forum Main PageDiscussion Forum Archives


WARNING: FIVE-O (AND OTHER) DVDS SOLD THROUGH SITES LIKE THOSE ADVERTISED BELOW MAY BE BOOTLEGS.