Hawaii Five-O Discussion Forum -- December 2015

The Hawaii Five-O Discussion Forum -- December 2015


The following are archived comments from December 2015. After looking around, please add your own comments!

Links back: Main PageDiscussion Forum Main PageDiscussion Forum Archives



Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Many thanks to all who participated in and stopped by to enjoy the festivities at Jack's 95th Birthday Celebration.

A special "mahalo nui" goes to Kanela, who had the idea for the party and planned it.

Added: Thursday 31 December 2015 08:57:43 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

I wear red - Jack's favorite color. I may eat some devil's food fudge in his memory.

Added: Tuesday 29 December 2015 14:56:46 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

John, over on "Remembering Jack Lord," we're having a party. Last week, members submitted birthday banners. Today, they are voting on their favorite from among the submissions. Tomorrow, they will vote on their favorite dishes for our virtual birthday dinner. Kanela developed the menu choices. On Wednesday, Jack's birthday, we will have party games, including multiple-choice, true-false, and essay questions about Jack and Marie. On Thursday, some of us may choose to watch "Dr No," which will be airing on New Year's Eve. Check locatetv.com for the broadcast time in your area.

So, hop on over. The party's in full swing, already.

Added: Monday 28 December 2015 11:15:03 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Hope all the Classic HFO fans had a wonderful Christmas! Prayers to those Texans who had the tornadoes touch down near Dallas! I'm curious with Jack Lord's birthday December 30...Do you do anything to celebrate Jack's birthday? Watching a FAV HFO episode or lighting a candle. Maybe, even a Season 3 Classic HFO marathon. To us Classic HFO fans, the McGarrett character resonates 48 years later. Went back to Year 1 to the Classic Yesterday Died when McGarrett is attacked by a vengeful Joe Trinnian. 3 shots at close range. This is an excellent episode for several reasons. McG and his Naval Officer years are discussed plus Danny steps up and leads the investigation while McG recovers. CPO Joe Trinnian one of the best early characters as he discusses his anger after being imprisoned for 15 years. Was he really guilty of the killing? Or was Joe justified in his angry, vengeful demeanor after being placed in prison for 15 years? The excellent ending with Trinnian in his CPO uniform walking up the stairs to finally finish AG...That's excellent photography and writing. Yesterday Died...A powerful episode and a strong 5 1/2 stars out of 6 stars. John

Added: Sunday 27 December 2015 20:23:43 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

I have seen "Death in Paradise" and it has the right blend of humor and personal lives of characters without taking away from the main goal of solving crimes. It's more relaxed and the crimes aren't as large-scale as the ones on H5O 1.0, but on "Death in Paradise," it's whodunits with red herrings. The characters are not phony, the dialogue is not forced or insulting, and the actors are believable, unlike on H5O 2.0.

Added: Sunday 20 December 2015 21:39:05 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

A few more ideas on the subject:

Have you ever watched "Death in Paradise"? It is a BBC production that airs on PBS in the US. Personal lives exist but are not allowed to become the focus of any episode. For example, Detective Inspector Humphrey Goodman (Kris Marshall) is shown at the very end of an episode calling to tell his father that he and his wife are divorcing, but the conversation is not shown. There is no need for it to be shown, because we all can imagine for ourselves how such a conversation would go.

Detective Sergeant Camille Borday's (Sarah Martins) mother, Catherine (Elizabeth Bourgine), owns a local restaurant and bar, yet appears only briefly to add a bit of humor as the detectives relax at the end of a case. No, they don't advertise products.

If you haven't seen "Death in Paradise," you can watch it on Netflix, and I suggest that you do. It is set in the Caribbean, on the fictitious island of Saint Marie. The name of the town where the police station is located is Honore (in homage to Honore Vashon, perhaps?). Some of the culture is shown. Some of the scenery is shown. Some of the Yuppies from Europe are shown. The building tycoon is a native islander, yet he aspires to build the same high rises and golf courses that the mainland developers have built in Hawai'i. So, there are some interesting parallels and differences.

The first detective inspector, Richard Poole (Ben Miller) was a stuffed shirt, always in a coat and tie with briefcase in hand, yet he had a brilliant mind for solving cases. His successor, Humphrey Goodman, is much more relaxed, yet even he wears a sports coat. Both are imports from Scotland Yard. At times, Goodman seems to be not very less clumsy than Jacques Clouseau (Peter Sellers), yet, like Poole, he has a brilliant mind for solving cases.

The detective sergeants are very much aware of their African / French / Dutch / English heritage, yet all are very much Caribbean islanders. They are likable, smart, but not as smart as the boss, of course. They play off each other not unlike the Danno / Kono / Chin Ho team on 1.0.

Actually, "Death in Paradise" is more like 1.0 than the present-day show that bears the same name as our beloved "Hawaii Five-0." Try it. You just might like it.

Added: Sunday 20 December 2015 19:24:56 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

The show has run into the very problem that goes along with basing it on characters, rather than the weekly crime solving. After a certain point, the writers run out of things for the character to do.

For example, what could have been said about Jack's McGarrett? He worked 16+ hours a day and slept on the white couch in his office, as often as not. On occasion, he played inexpert games of golf and tennis, but even then, his mind was on his work; in fact, in one episode (name forgotten), when the key to the case came to him in the middle of a game of golf, he walked out on Mayor Frank Fasi. What could one say about McGarrett if he hadn't had a case to solve? Even when his sister's baby was dying, McGarrett was thinking like a cop and nearly lost his sister's love in the process.

There's not much to say about men like McGarrett's personal lives, because they have very little of one. Far better it is to focus on them doing their work. Or, in the terminology of writing, don't lose sight of your aim. In this case, the aim should be to show the detectives solving their cases.

Added: Sunday 20 December 2015 17:48:30 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

Too much focus on the characters' personal lives spoils a show. It works well in a soap opera, where they have 260 episodes and 20 characters for whom they have to write storylines, but for a crime drama that goes for 24 episodes a year, it's impossible to work in storylines on personal lives of four main characters when you have to work in storylines on the crime of the week, scenes with the forensic people, the coroner, the DA, and other personnel. The crime itself and the investigation of it should be enough to keep the audience's interest. If you have to fill up screen time with storylines about a character's love life, some relative that comes up from the past to cause more trouble, old flames, issues with children, etc., then that means that the main storyline is too weak and underdeveloped.

It is possible to tell a compelling story about a crime that was committed, focusing on the main characters solely in the manner of how they do their jobs, and still give your audience an insight into who they are as people. The way they conduct the investigation and interact with each other and suspects and victims should say enough.

Added: Sunday 20 December 2015 15:47:57 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

I haven't seen an episode since the internment episode, so I really can't follow this discussion. Still, I agree with what she said about the couples therapy story line. It's senseless. Maybe they should do what 1.0 did and not delve into the characters' personal lives unless they have a bearing on the case at hand. Let's face it: Who cares whether they're gay or straight? It's no one's business but their own. After all, was McGarrett any less of a character when all we knew about his home was that he had a yellow alarm clock?

Added: Saturday 19 December 2015 16:09:19 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

There is nothing gay about their relationship. They spend a lot of time with each other because of their job, almost to the point where they seem like they are married, so they fight like a married couple. It was funny in the beginning, but it got old fast. I agree about the lady cop from San Francisco. The last thing this show needs is another love interest, and the writers seem to group women into different stereotypes. They're either inept, unusually athletic for their shapes, Jacks-of-all-trades, just plain dull, creeps, or dopey.

Added: Saturday 19 December 2015 14:03:35 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I am having an interesting discussion with a friend. She writes:

This show [the new Five-0] has zero clue how to write a female. It's irksome. The Chin-crush chick seems to lack personality. Also, the [writers?] manage to kick up a small number of livelier eps each year. But frustratingly few. I am dreading the next one. I hate the couples therapy thing. It's an insult to the PTSD therapy story they began and then summarily dropped. McG's ridiculously difficult and dangerous civilian life, and all his dead friends getting to him? Let him go into couples therapy with his grumpy jerky partner, and let's pretend they are acting gay, cause that's funny in 2015 when gay people actually can get married and Americans have finally stopped seeing them as aberrations. How avant-garde.

Added: Saturday 19 December 2015 11:11:33 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Over on "Remembering Jack Lord" (www.rememberingjacklord.com), we're recalling our favorite lines from all 284 episodes of "Hawaii Five-0." Why not hop over and add your favorite line. It's all happening in the Guestbook. Hope to see your favorite lines.

Added: Saturday 19 December 2015 09:33:31 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

That's what I meant: He had done all he can, and no more. He was working with a cast he did not like, except for Moe and Duke, and regardless of the ratings, this was the last year and there was no renewal issue.

To this day, though, many still talk as though Jack was the bad guy in all of this, when it was really CBS, certain producers, directors, actors, and crew members who were the troublemakers.

I saw this firsthand while working on the book and consulting on the documentary. Some of those people were downright nasty.

Added: Friday 18 December 2015 15:37:22 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

I'm not sure that statement is entirely correct, Vrinda. It wasn't in Jack's nature not to care. If we go back and look at still photos taken during the last season of H50, we see that he was skin and bones. He also looked exhausted - ill, even. We can compare them with pictures taken of him some eight months after H50 wrapped up Season 12 filming and see that he has gained weight and looks more refreshed, yet not yet up to par. It wasn't that Jack gave up. It was that he had given everything he had to give, including his health.

Added: Thursday 17 December 2015 07:04:27 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

"There's only one explanation: Jack was more tired in Season 12 than we realized."

Jack didn't care anymore. He wasn't doing line readings or rehearsals by then, either. He just went in, filmed his scenes, and got of there.

Added: Tuesday 16 December 2015 19:20:25 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

"Though the Heavens Fall" is probably my favorite season 12 episode. Always enjoyed it!

Added: Tuesday 16 December 2015 15:24:19 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

I agree about "Though the Heavens Fall," John. It was good until the escape. I felt that the door to the shed had been left unlocked on purpose to entice Truck, Kimo, and Meredith to make a break for it. That would enable the vigilante sportsmen to rationalize killing them. That much works for me. There, it ends.

Truck's wearing a bright shirt. Meredith is a wimp to beat all wimps. How the vigilantes didn't shoot them in the first ten yards is unfathomable. Then, Truck and Kimo hide Meredith behind the trunk of a pili nut tree. Are we really supposed to believe the vigilantes couldn't hear him breathing? He was so out of breath they should have had him tested for emphysema.

But the real killer of that scene is when Truck is shot, but McGarrett stays up in the helicopter, instead of landing to pick up Truck and having the helicopter pilot take him to the hospital. That part of the scene is a total and complete DUD DUD DUD !!! Was this the same McGarrett who lost it every time something happened to Danno? That McGarrett would have taken Truck to the hospital, leaving Kimo at the scene to help the HPD tie up loose ends. There's only one explanation: Jack was more tired in Season 12 than we realized. He really dropped the ball in this scene.

Added: Tuesday 16 December 2015 11:33:01 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

You have me thinking HFO Forever! I think my version could be exciting if Charlie Mitchell was not dead but goes through an interesting talk on the witness stand. Talking about discussions with other POW's who were there and other photographic evidence pointing to Muramoto as the Commandant. They could use vivid flashbacks of the War during some of the POW's time on the stand. Remember some of the best Hawaii Five O episodes involved some courtroom drama. Once Upon A Time, Jury Of One, The Vashons Trilogy etc. I know When Does A War End? is a poor episode but there is a good story in there. Maybe, they could utilize the investigative reporter Boyd more as a valuable witness on both sides.
On another note, I watched Though The Heavens Fall after reading Mr. Mike's article about the sword fighting of Brian who delivered an excellent account of his remembrances from the episode and some background info. I liked Truck and Kimo's undercover work at the exclusive Sportsman's Club. The daughter who becomes attracted to Collins the archery expert (Kimo) was attractive and a good character. The capture of Meredith from his house and down the cliff was a great scene. Things start going South when Kimo, Truck, & Meredith are all placed together and escape. The escape was too easy with the broken door or one that didn't close. I guess the point it had a Most Dangerous Game feel. They were hunting them down. Truck was a moving target with that yellow coat. McG arrived Double Exposure style just in time. I'd give Though The Heavens Fall 3 stars out of 6 on my 6 star system. Thanks to all the Classic HFO fan regulars here on the forum and Mr. Mike for the excellent site. John

Added: Tuesday 16 December 2015 10:23:52 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

The investigation in part one followed by the trial in part two sounds like "Law & Order" to me. How would you make part two interesting, John? After all, it can't be as dry as a real-life trial would be with character witnesses for each side contradicting what the other says.

Too, the story was as much about insanity as it was about post-war sentiment. Alicia Wade (Anne Francis) was bitter after being rejected by Yohio Moromoto (Bennett Ohta), while Willie Barker (David Dukes) was mentally unstable and a pawn for anyone who needed one.

Would you try Alicia and Willie separately or as co-conspirators? Were they really co-conspirators when Alicia was using Willie. She, after all, was the primary suspect. How would the district attorney elect to handle this? Do we have any lawyers on board who could answer this for us?

Added: Tuesday 16 December 2015 07:53:37 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

I think they should do a Hawaii Five O movie of When Does A War End? They could update the Season 10 version with some new characters of Muramoto, Willy Barker, an alive Charlie Mitchell who confronts Muramoto. The 2nd part would be brand new court trial with witnesses for and against Muramoto. Businessman and friends stating about his kindness and his progressive style. It would be exciting and be Hawaii Five O and Perry Mason all rolled into one.
Somebody mentioned FOB Honolulu. That would be fun and exciting with all the different characters.
With all the technology, I wonder if they could bring Jack Lord & team into 2015. Like they never aged. That would be 2 thumbs up from me. John

Added: Tuesday 15 December 2015 21:23:08 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Mike, I think it's possible that production on MAGNUM PI got delayed because the first season only had 17 episodes. I doubt that if they had a full 22-episode season produced that they wouldn't air the remaining 5 episodes just because the show started airing a bit late (in December). Though I suppose it's possible that they didn't have the full season layed out and just filmed maybe half a season to start. Then decided not to do 22 episodes and cut it down to just 17.

Added: Tuesday 15 December 2015 11:21:13 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Deli, I cast my vote for a full-length feature movie of "FOB Honolulu." But don't remake it. Just piece together the two episodes into a continuous 100-minute movie, give it a good build-up, and show viewers what a well-crafted movie can and should be.

"FOB Honolulu" had it all, from international espionage to a wayward intelligence officer to a femme fatale in a red dress, batting her eyelashes. It also had something modern-day spy thrillers don't have: something that makes the villains likable. Wo Fat could be very personable when he wasn't working (especially notable in "And a Time to Die," as he played chess with the little girl). Mischa was as shrewd as any spy could be, yet he was as laid back as a brown bear against a log. No doubt, this put more than a few antagonists off their guard.

I think I'll watch "FOB Honolulu" today.

Added: Tuesday 15 December 2015 09:49:52 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Magnum, P.I. is celebrating its 35th anniversary this month. It first aired on December 11, 1980.

https://ca.style.yahoo.com/post/135069662870/happy-35th-anniversary-magnum-pi-20-things

According to Wikipedia, the show "was due to start filming in March 1980. However, because of the 1980 AFTRA/Screen Actors Guild strike, the start of production on Magnum was delayed until December 1980." This is not correct, though. The show didn't >air< until December because of the strike.

Added: Tuesday 15 December 2015 09:25:06 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Good call on Hookman! Definitely in my Top 5 Hookman Classic HFO. Was looking through the list of 1-12 seasons HFO thinking of undervalued and underrated episodes. Three underrated episodes for me include: 1.6000 Deadly Tickets. An interesting subject with the airline tickets matter including a daring daylight killing and theft of tickets. Poor Ollie tried to blow the whistle and his storefront was blown out by a left-handed bomber. Ollie lost his life. That canal chase was something. McG ducking bullets from the boat too. 2.Assault On The Palace. The Wilcox Rebellion Reenactment as a disguise for the robbery was ingenious and excellently performed. Arthur had a genius plan and it would have worked but unraveled. He forgot to take Kalani's wallet or make the crime appear as a stranger had done it. They also found the ? on Arthur's program that Kalani had not approved. In the end, McG rightly distilled it down with Arthur as the mastermind. Agree with Mr.Mike that this ending was substandard. 3.Dealer's Choice Blackmail. John Ritter was an outstanding actor and he delivered an excellent performance as a gambling addict who witnesses the hit and run murder of a cop. Mike escaped from an illegal gambling house raided by the police. He decides to blackmail the crime syndicate leader who killed the cop. His sister Sandi Welles is an HPD young officer and thinks Mike could be in trouble gambling again. A thing I noticed...The thug listens into the conversation placed by Mike to the crime leader. Talking about money and drop point. It's funny that the thug didn't recognize Mike's voice when he was the pilot. Asking where to drop off the money etc. I like this episode for many reasons. Shows how addicts will lie and manipulate to continue their habit. Family like Sandi are roped into the web and placed in tough position. Alcohol, drug, gambling and other addictions still prevalent today...This episode shines a truthful light on gambling addiction. Classic HFO fans! What are a couple Classic HFO episodes that you think deserve more praise or that you think are underrated? John

Added: Monday 14 December 2015 21:04:17 MST


Submitted by: DeliWaiter
From: Ken's House of Pancakes

I re-watched "Hookman" the other day and I had goose bumps the whole time! What a fantastic episode! From the first scene where we see the Coffin pop out of the Hearse, you know it is going to be intense! I love when Hookman is driving and grappling the stickshift to change gears, metal on metal! When he chowing on the Swanson TV dinner, and his bitter stab at the food, TV doesn't get any better than that! Something about this episode resonates through the decades and besides the Internment Camp episode, the best of the 2.0 shows. Perhaps Alex and Scott will develop amnesia and the producers will decide to have a dream sequence where they go back to the 70's and remake all the great old shows for us picky and uppity Five-O fans on heah!One can hope! (Actually I think a feature-length film would be great but doubtfully will ever happen, unless a big star gets behind it. Who would the folks on this board like to see if they were casting a Five O FILM with an unlimited budget?

Added: Monday 14 December 2015 16:25:13 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

No Mike, I actually understood why you edited my Moonves comments and probably would have done the same if I was you, you had to do that. Moonves is disliked by me for personal reasons related to the industry and programs he cancels and green lights and other matters of programming because of behind the scenes things that I know.

You were right to ban those comments of mine. He can be brilliant when it comes to programming like finding "Scorpion". but in other matters he gets me mad from a professional point of view. Don't blame you for doing that.

Added: Monday 14 December 2015 12:51:08 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Rainbow, that was quite a reasonable reply.

But I have something else for you to discuss!

If you have something to say, I hope I won't have to edit it as much as the last time you commented on this guy...

:!wondering:

Added: Monday 14 December 2015 12:39:39 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Mike,

I enjoy the challenge but you're making my points for me. In California, the majority of people there will always use the canard "racism and bigotry" when they have lost the argument like he did. Also, in New York City my views are in the minority and not the majority so I really don't care what anyone has to say about New York so knock yourself out there.

The state of California is in awful shape because many there hold the views that Fred does. The economy is in the dumper, there is a huge water drought where people can't water their lawns, take normal showers and use the toilet normally because they are diverting the water to protect a fish the size of a paperclip. People are moving out because of high taxes, over regulation, and illegal immigration running wild, so how is California being sold so short by my comments?

I also find it interesting that Fred was the one that called me and the other posters on this board who overwhelmingly agreed with me as sheep, he was the wolf, and that we all had blinders on. He made a snide comment about the greatest generation that only saved the world so guys like him can focus on that whole 1960's self involvement thing that is so prevalent. He started the conversation, lost it not only in discussion but with the majority of other posters siding with me, where I and the others were very civil. Maybe we cut to close to the bone with people who disagree with us, but as some on this board know, I am well aware that you will always side against me no matter how aggressive the attitude is towards me because you disagree with my views.

I would say that I am well aware of where your views stand.

They want to start it, I'll finish it as always, and you you will always take the side opposite me no matter how wrong the other side is. No matter how many others agree with me. That's fine. In the real world, I do quite well. You can get mad at me, close the forum, bar me, it doesn't matter it has no effect on my life. I'll never stop calling people out for a way of thinking that is driving the United States into the dumper.

What would surprise me is if you ever once called someone out who was wrong in their comments with me. I did quite well thank you in showing his thinking is representative of the ideological mindset of the majority of people in California. You don't like me- big surprise.

Added: Monday 14 December 2015 12:34:37 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

"[Y]ou're [sic] been indoctrinated out in the biggest pasture of them all-California."

Come on, Rainbow, you can come up with better ammunition for your arguments than ridiculing where someone lives. We have seen this before from you, i.e., people in Washington State are dope heads.

After all, people have plenty of bad things to say about New York City from "an open air medium security system for the criminally insane" on down.

Added: Monday 14 December 2015 10:40:08 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Sorry Fred, you are the sheep, you just don't know it, because you're been indoctrinated out in the biggest pasture of them all-California.

When I see someone use racism and bigotry for everything when they are losing the argument-you're the sheep.

You just met the lion and he roared wolf man.

Added: Sunday 13 December 2015 13:38:29 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Last night's episode reviewed:

http://mjq.net/fiveo/2010-log6.htm#10

Added: Saturday 12 December 2015 12:07:14 MST


Submitted by: honu59
From: New York

Happy Birthday to Al Harrington, 80 years young today!

Added: Saturday 12 December 2015 06:29:42 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Rainbow,

You're right about lack of class in today's generation. I work with guys my age and younger and almost none of them shave - it's like they can't afford a razor. Facial hair is in right now. Personally I can't stand facial hair on me because I know if I go 3 days without shaving it starts poking at me anytime any facial contact is made. Now, I know that some like mustaches and beards and that's all fine and dandy - as long as it's nicely groomed and looks classy. But what's popular today is basically this unshaven scraggly look which looks ugly and just plain unprofessional.

Another pet peeve of mine is tattoos. Can't stand 'em!! Even a small tattoo on a girl is a total turn-off for me. You can't watch a basketball game these days without seeing those ball players with their arms and other body parts completely covered in tattoos. They look like animals who just escaped from the jungle! Or hardened criminals!! It looks nasty and completely unprofessional. These "gentlemen" are representing the NBA??? You watch any of the older games from the 80s or even 90s and you don't see this kind of tattoo madness on the NBA court (Dennis Rodman notwithstanding). People just had more class back then and a better upbringing.

"Get off my lawn."

Haha! You must be a fan of Clint Eastwood's GRAN TORINO. Great film and great performance!!

Added: Friday 11 December 2015 21:35:52 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

My views on this board are generally in the minority. That's fine. I'd rather be the wolf than the sheep. And I'd rather not live with blinders.

Today is today. It is what it is and you can't go back. Sorry. And, once again, every generation evolves from the previous one. Even the "greatest generation" the one where racism and bigotry was readily adhered to, had it's delinquents. Read "Unbroken". You'll see that Louie Zamperini was far from an angel growing up and yet he is regarded, as he should be, as a hero.

Added: Friday 11 December 2015 16:46:58 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

Rainbow:

The ignorance of many young people is very disturbing. You are on target in how ignorant they are of the world before they were born. I donĂt know where the mentality comes from that kids today should ignore everything from the past as though it never happened, but a lot of it has to do with parents who donĂt give their children any guidance, and the media that have stopped airing older TV shows and films.

When was the last time TBS aired a sitcom from the Š60s or Š70s, or the last time TNT showed a classic film? TCM has classic films now, but not everyone has it or watches it. AMC ceased to be American Movie Classics long ago, and Nick at Nite hasnĂt shown any good programming in over 15 years.

Education has also changed the way young people think. Civics courses went out the window years ago, and parents complain curricula is made more challenging, claiming it discriminates against minority groups or some other group, so lesson plans are dumbed down and kidsĂ are shortchanged in their learning process. Kids arenĂt even taught that an education is important. TheyĂre more interested in socializing and being popular. They donĂt respect themselves or each other, and are quick to put down another child who isnĂt as pretty or handsome, athletic, or wears the latest fashions. They donĂt care about improving themselves or think of their future.

In the Š80s and Š90s, when I was a child and teenager, I was curious about the past, as were many kids I knew. There were the apathetic ones who only embraced the here and now, but it was just to be what they considered trendy. They outgrew that behavior. I donĂt see that with many kids today. The parents donĂt set a good example anyway, so this is no surprise.

Added: Friday 11 December 2015 16:10:49 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Thank you, Rainbow. It's like everything else in life. We get out of something what we put into it. Our children should receive our best input.

Added: Friday 11 December 2015 11:42:28 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Really nice post H50! We obviously think alike and agree!

Added: Friday 11 December 2015 10:48:28 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Fred,

I wasn't supporting your point when I mentioned hippies. I was backing up my point that the parents you mentioned were right about the "kids" or "hippies" of the 1960's. While the protest of the Vietnam War was right because it shouldn't have been fought, the way they did it was flat wrong. They disrespected our veterans who just did their duty and served their country and should not have been deemed as "baby killers" or spit on for that, even though the war was a huge mistake and a waste. They did too much drugs, had too much irresponsibility and anarchy.

They have kept that attitude as adults and were bad role models for their kids. So my point was the older people were right about the kids of the 1960's and the older people like me are right about the kids of today. It has been a precipitous drop off in this country in each generations respect for people and society since the 1960's. Their is a lack of culture, refinement and grace among them. I love classical music. How many of the younger generation today even knows what that is or how to use it in a movie or television show? Do you think they know the great composers that Mike talks about often on this site. Their is something really wrong with our culture today. I love Japan because they have a deep respect for their culture, their elders, and their history, and that isn't too much in evidence in the US. That is not supporting your point. If I am, then please show me how.

I am not angry or mad or even not opposed to considering your point of view which is hard to tell in my writing, but my larger meaning is that the younger people of today are dangerously misinformed in how they live their life and that is more than an old person like me saying "Get off my lawn."

Added: Thursday 10 December 2015 12:00:46 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Rainbow: You make a good point while supporting my point when you mention "hippies". I could go on, but I don't want use the forum to argue about the evolving of cultures.

Added: Thursday 10 December 2015 11:37:04 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Bravo, Rainbow! You nailed it!

I was born in 1948. My parents were from The Greatest Generation (born 1915 and 1917). Parenting was done on essentially three levels, depending on how a child responded. First, reasoning. Some children would come around if you just explained things to them. Second, taking away privileges for misbehaving. Most responded to this. Third, a good spanking, not to be confused with beating. This was reserved for those children and offenses when Methods 1 and 2 failed or the offense was particularly bad, like stealing.

We went to church every Sunday. The denomination wasn't nearly as important as what we learned there. My dad's engineering firm had three partners. He was Methodist. Mr. Chesson was Catholic. Mr. Forrest was Jewish. They had a winning team and designed electrical and mechanical systems for schools, hospitals, etc., including the student union, chemistry building, and business building at LSU. They didn't worry about Joel having to leave early on Fridays to go to temple or whether Don was eating fish on Fridays. They were too busy being engineers.

Fathers, as well as mothers, helped to entertain the kids. Mr. Jack (surname) drove us to movies across town. Mr. Singer made ice cream floats (called Black Cows) like no one else. Mr. Brumfield took us to the blessing of the shrimp fleet in Morgan City, down in Cajun Country. Mr. Heaton let us use his workshop to make a state seal with products produced in the state (rice for the pelican, for example). We went up to the state capitol building to present it to the governor, who put it on display. You will notice that all were Mister + surname. We did not become too familiar with parents. They were Mr. and Mrs.

At school, there was a dress code. If your skirt was too short, you were sent home to change. If your hair was too long, you were sent home to be taken for a haircut. If you were caught smoking, you were suspended for three days. If you vandalized property, you either paid for repairs or were expelled, depending on the severity of the damage. The guiding rule was from Gilbert and Sullivan: "Let the punishment fit the crime."

Scouting was important. Sports were important. Piano and ballet lessons were important. Ceramics and art classes were important. But, then, our mothers were at home to take us to those lessons. They weren't trying to climb the corporate ladder and prove they were more masculine than the men around them.

It takes two parents to rear a child, and it takes a community to rear a child. Today, no one wants to make the effort. They'll pay more than half of what they earn for daycare during the week and try to convince everyone, including themselves, that they are super moms and super dads on weekends. Not good enough.

That's what's wrong with society today. Children are left to rear themselves. They grow up with no regard for authority, including parents, teachers, the police, or even the people next door. Why should they feel respect for others? No one teaches them to.

Added: Thursday 10 December 2015 11:24:47 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Fred:

I wasn't alive in the 1960's and I didn't reach eight years old until 1978. I'm a product of the last 1970's from 1975 on and the 1980's. I was raised by 1950's parents and most of my friends through college were. Our parents were raised or part of the greatest generation and neither myself, my siblings, or my friends ever had that said about them growing up. There was a maturity among us that doesn't exist now in the younger generation but there is a dangerous entitlement attitude now among young people that has been extremely bad for this country on a multitude of levels. To deny that is to deny that this country is in it's worse shape than it's ever been because of the complete ignorance and lack of knowledge about what went on in the world before they were born.

I'm tired of people excusing the cultural dumbing down of the young generations in this country as it "was always this way." No it wasn't. I'm not talking about liking Elvis or the Beatles, I'm talking about the lack of respect for others, their lives, and knowing what is class and what isn't. The young men today dress like homeless people, think not shaving is cool, wearing a suit is too hard to do, and having a general knowledge of what occurred before they lived is not necessary.

The hippies in the 1960's weren't exactly good role models for the kids they raised.

Big Chicken: Always a highlight when you make an appearance in the forum.

Ringfire: I hear you on Magnum, but I just never cared for it. Didn't float my boat.

Added: Thursday 10 December 2015 07:56:34 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Interesting observations. Things always seem to lose something when they are altered. Because of the changes, the two-parter surely would have been required to have different production numbers. After all, with a nip here and a tuck there, it became a different production.

I find it interesting to compare the film version to the draft version of the script that sells on Ebay from time to time. Some changes are clearly understood, such as the jailed protesters not singing "If I Had a Hammer," as the script requires (copyright reasons). Other changes are not as clear; in fact, in one instance, when Miller (Andrew Duggan) says, "...that's no hallucination!", his intonation is inappropriate for what has been said on film, yet makes perfect sense based on how the "kumu" scene was written in the script.

In any case, I'm glad we got the entire program, complete with historical notes at the beginning, on the DVD. I also like the longer, richer arrangement of the theme song, which is heard on the DVD, but not the two-parter, which received the episodic 59-second theme.

Added: Tuesday 09 December 2015 19:23:58 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

I was comparing the pilot episode in two parts to the "movie" pilot which is on the DVDs and also the Columbia House tape. I haven't investigated it any further than what is below, though.

DVD/COLUMBIA HOUSE VERSION - ORIGINAL PILOT

Production number is 1310-5246-2669

DVD total time is 1:36:58; the Columbia House tape time is 1:35:19. I have no explanation for the difference here. These are supposed to be the same thing. The DVD has a blab at the beginning, approximately 21 seconds long, explaining that the two-hour pilot was broadcast a week before the show began. (This 21 seconds is not included in the above figure for the DVD.)

The scene corresponding to the end of Part 1 in the two-part version is at approximately 55:08. In the two-part version, it ends with a freeze-frame of McGarrett's face as he is lifting up the entrance to the cocoon. In the pilot, he closes this entrance (this brief sequence appears at the beginning of Part 2). The extra time here can presumably be accounted for the stuff at the beginning of the show like the tour bus scene with Yankee Chang, etc.

The end credits for the DVD/CH version are superimposed over the champagne glasses that McGarrett and Rosemary have clicked together at the end. The type used for these credits doesn't look right to me; it is too white and too clean). Instead, it looks like something that someone manufactured for the Columbia House tape which was used as the basis of the pilot on the DVD.

TWO-PART VERSION

This consists of the original pilot edited into two 1-hour episodes which were shown at the end of season one. These are available for download from Amazon.com and perhaps other services. (Amazon.com also has the original pilot.) I don't know where my version came from, I think it was recorded off TBS a long time ago.

The production number is 1310-1729-1383 for each of both parts. According to some CBS episode listing I have, the production numbers for parts one and two as separate episodes are supposedly 1331/6824 and 1331/6825 respectively. These two numbers (the last part of each) are the same as in the CBS syndication bible. This information is for "international syndication only." There is nothing about the original pilot in this listing at all; the CBS bible (see my WWW site) explains how the two-hour shows are numbered.

Part one is approx. 51:18, part two is approx. 51:12 (I put a bit of "blue leader" between the acts and also between the two parts). The total of these two is 1:42:30. There is a lengthy "previously on" segment at the beginning of part two which is about 6:54 in length (includes main titles which are 0.57 long). If you remove this, the total time is 1:35:26.

The end credits for this two-part version are in the usual font used for the first season on, superimposed over the blue light on the back of the motorcycle. The actors' credits reflect who is in the part, i.e., Leslie Nielsen is only in the first part, James Gregory and Lew Ayres are only in the second part. The production credits like music, editor, etc. are the same for both parts.

ONE-PART VERSION

Does this exist? A version made up of the two part-version with the "previously on" segment removed? I used to have a version of the pilot in French, but I cannot find it any more. (I think I may have given it away.)

Added: Tuesday 09 December 2015 18:06:41 MST


Submitted by: Fred
From: Chatsworth, CA

Rainbow Warrior says: "For a generation that thinks they know it all and don't need to be told anything they remarkably know so little, and have no taste or class in how they dress, act, or conduct themselves. Spoiled, entitled little brats."

Sounds exactly the same as what my parent's generation said about us in the 60's and 70's. I think it goes with the age and maturity.

Mike: That is indeed very sad news about Jimmy. I wish him well.

Added: Tuesday 09 December 2015 12:20:33 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Ringfire;

There is a lot that is lost on today's ADD Generation which is why the country and the world is so messed up.

For a generation that thinks they know it all and don't need to be told anything they remarkably know so little, and have no taste or class in how they dress, act, or conduct themselves. Spoiled, entitled little brats.

Added: Tuesday 09 December 2015 07:44:53 MST


Submitted by: Vrinda
From: NJ

It's easier to follow hand-to-hand combat than it is to follow wit and intellectual trickery.

It's another example of how H5O2 appeals to the lowest common denominator viewer.

Added: Tuesday 08 December 2015 21:55:09 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

"My opinion is that the earlier Wo Fat seemed to be a bit of a clown at times"

Gee, let me guess... because the earlier Wo Fat was a sophisticated villain with a clever sense of humor instead of a muscular fighter who engages in hardcore hand to hand combat?? It's a shame that the witty and clever villainy of yesteryear is lost on today's ADD generation.

Added: Tuesday 08 December 2015 17:53:29 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Right you are, Mike! There's no one better to play Wo Fat than Khigh Dhiegh!

"McGARRETT!!!" (Hiss!)

Added: Tuesday 08 December 2015 13:03:49 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

IMDB discussion, who is the best Wo Fat?

===

SkilpadNinja: Who is better at playing Wo Fat? My opinion is that the earlier Wo Fat seemed to be a bit of a clown at times, not really threatening but Mark Dacascos on the other hand (emoticon for "hairrise").

====

kstrumpf: Sorry, but there is no contest. Dacascos is a fine actor but there wouldn't even be a Wo Fat in the current series if the original actor hadn't made him into such an iconic villain. Think of all the villains in the original H5O who haven't been brought back. Why Wo Fat? Because the original actor was so amazing and memorable.

Added: Tuesday 08 December 2015 10:07:43 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!

Melanie Griffith is reportedly back on the set of #H50 as Danno's mother.

Added: Tuesday 08 December 2015 01:36:20 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Sad news from the Star-Advertiser:

By Michael Tsai

[The beginning of the story is missing...]

Jimmy BorgesĂ liver cancer returned about a year ago and spread to his lungs. He said his cancer doctor told him late last month that patients with cancer similar to his are largely beyond treatment.

˘I was born in paradise and IĂm leaving in paradise,÷ said HawaiiĂs 80-year-old jazz ĂnĂ pops singer Saturday in a phone call. ˘DonĂt feel sorry for me. IĂve had a wonderful life and would not trade it for any other. Life is great. I did what I set out to do, to have people pay to see me sing.

˘At 80 years old I was able to complete my first album and headline a Honolulu Pops Concert with my lungs filled with cancer. I had to revise the arrangements as I could not hold the notes as long as I used to. It was mind over matter.÷

Jimmy says he is not down about the medical news and is extremely proud that the Jimmy Borges Memorial Scholarship is being established. Organizers are former Hawaiian Electric President Robert Clarke, former First Hawaiian Bank chief Walter Dods and PBS Hawaii President Leslie Wilcox. Jimmy said he wants to be an inspiration to anyone undergoing serious medical problems and for young people hoping to make it in show business.

The scholarship announcement was made at a filmed event at the PBS Hawaii studio Thursday, when Jimmy revealed his medical condition to those present.

˘I didnĂt want my condition announced earlier because I did not want pity,÷ he said.

The audience was made up of people contributing to the scholarship. He was backed by pianist Dan Del Negro, drummer Noel Okimoto, bassist Bruce Hamada and Mike Lewis on trumpet. ˘We rehearsed one hour before the event,÷ Jimmy said.

I discovered Jimmy for local audiences back in 1968 when I was entertainment editor of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin and he was singing in San Francisco. A picture from the Associated Press wound up on my desk. The caption read that it was a picture of a singer named Jimmy Borges from Honolulu who will be on ˘The Jonathan WintersShow.÷ I had never heard of a singer by that name, so I asked the AP to put me in contact with him. The agency did, and I contacted him and wrote about him.

He told me he left Saint Louis School when his family moved to the Bay Area when he was 12. When he came home to Honolulu in 1970, we got together, became golf partners and have been close friends ever since.

Jimmy and his dear wife, Vicki, attended all my birthday parties, and he sang at and even emceed most of them. We discuss football nearly every week: Marcus Mariota, the San Francisco 49ers, the University of Hawaii and top NFL games. He told me we have something else in common: ˘We love to be surrounded by beautiful women.÷

We both laughed.

When he gave me the news to break about his liver cancer in 2011, it hit me hard. When he told me a couple of months ago about the cancer coming back and going into his lungs, that was awful. He asked me not to reveal it until he gave the OK.

On JimmyĂs swell new album, titled simply ˘Jimmy Borges,÷ the last song is ˘Aloha ŠOe.÷ One of JimmyĂs many fans is Waters Martin. At the October European Cinema Gala at the Moana Surfrider, Waters came up to me and said he was troubled by ˘Aloha ŠOe÷ (˘Farewell to Thee÷) being JimmyĂs final song. I told Jimmy about it, and he said Waters was right, as it was a way to say goodbye, as was Jimmy singing ˘My Way÷ at the Nov. 28 Pops concert.

Jimmy said he will be cremated, with ashes spread into the ocean and some sprinkled near the wahine statue in front of the Blaisdell Concert Hall, venue for many of his performances. He said he will have services in a Catholic church and at KawaiahaŠo Church to pay homage to his Hawaiian bloodline.

˘IĂm very proud to be part-Hawaiian,÷ he said.

Added: Monday 07 December 2015 16:27:16 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Hey Big Chick, I can def see a laid-back law-is-cool slacker like yourself being a bit of a MAG-head.

You're right about the Bo Svenson ep having some similarities to Five-O's "The Reunion" (love that eppie!) A presumed dead old wartime torturer coming back with a complicated scheme for revenge!

ROCKFORD FILES is indeed the granddaddy of all PI shows that followed. No one could touch Jimmy Garner when it came to running a good con!

Added: Monday 07 December 2015 09:16:28 MST


Submitted by: Big Chicken
From: Outside The Box

'My favorite line from the article was this "the legendary Hawaii Five-O" they got that right eh Big Chicken!'

Right on, Rainbow Warrior. You may remember that WOR in the NYC ran Five-O & Magnum back to back in the afternoons, back in the day - allowin one to stay in that Hawaiian state oĂ mind. And as Mags featured Five-O alumniĂs like Elissa Dulce and Kwan Hi Lim, not to mention our man Kam Fong, some a the same familiar locales and gave frequent shout outs to 5-O - I could dig that and would stay tuned in.

And as Chicken was a young slacker, he could also dig that depiction a ˘carefree island livin÷ that you mention, Ringfire. And I do remember digin the pilot ep, the Vietnam themed eps wit MagnumĂs wife and the Bo Svenson eps that seem like a nod to 5-OĂs ŠReunion.Ă

But otherwise gotta agree with you ,Warrior, Magnum on the whole jus not too memorable and like the 80Ăs San Diego PIs ˘Simon & Simon,÷ they all just emulatin Rockford, which was a much better show.

Chicken think "the legendary Hawaii Five-O" will outlive the low grade current impostor show, and hopefully us Five-O Heads will get an authentic big screen adaptation. Mr. Mike ű did they option yo screenplay yet?

Added: Sunday 06 December 2015 22:57:06 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

ROFL. Yes, I believe he did say he poked from Hondo, Texas. Sorry. I'm not as fluent in Texan as I am in English. LOL

Added: Saturday 05 December 2015 08:44:10 MST


Submitted by: ringfire211
From: Philadelphia

Mike, thanks for that MAGNUM PI article. I enjoyed it and had a good chuckle as I read it, even if it was being a bit critical of the show.

"half-brother who was said to hail from Hondo, Texas"

H50 1.0 FOREVER, I believe the actual line by Elmo Ziller (Higgins' half-brother) was "I poke from Hondo, Texas" :D which of course made Magnum break out into his patented little girl laugh.

I'm in the same boat as John H. about MAGNUM in that I used to think the show was dumb and didn't care for it at all and now I find myself quite the fan. The thing is that I grew up loving everything about the 80s (KNIGHT RIDER, A-TEAM, AIRWOLF, etc. - mostly in the 90s) and I knew that MAGNUM was such a famous show from that era that I really wanted to like it. But for some reason I just couldn't. I mean it had an awesome theme song, a gorgeous red Ferrari, the tropical paradise of Hawaii (I was already a huge FIVE-0 fan) but I just couldn't connect with it. The cases that Magnum worked on seemed too insignificant and banal (or tawdry as Higgins might have called them ;)), the villains seemed lame, no sense of danger, and the thing that really drove me nuts was the idiotic (or so I thought at the time) bickering between Magnum and Higgins as well as Magnum's constant whining. I just couldn't get into any of this. Then around 3 years ago or so I decided to check out the pilot episode and found it a bit intriguing (connection to Magnum's Vietnam past) and then found a few more "serious" episodes that I could enjoy - "Did You See the Sun Rise?" being the cream of the crop (with Bo Svenson as the ruthless Ivan). So at that point I decided that I liked the serious episodes but not the comical ones. But then I slowly decided to watch them all in order from the beginning and somehow the show miraculously began to win me over. What's more is that I began to hang out on the MAGNUM-MANIA site and found it really fascinating with its in-depth reviews and message boards for each episode. All of a sudden I began to appreciate the laid-back nature of the show, the low-key cases, the beach bum nature of Magnum and his pals Rick and T.C., and most of all the brilliance of John Hillerman as Higgins. I'm convinced now that he was the true star of the show - its heart and soul. His wartime stories (in North Africa, India, Australia, the Andes, the Khyber Pass, Philippines, Mongolia, you name it) which bored Magnum to tears have me chuckling each and every time! :D What I thought was a dumb throwaway show revealed itself as a fairly cleverly written, subversive, and even ahead-of-its-time show! It's like the genius of SEINFELD - a show about nothing! There's also just something special about revisiting this "TV family" and seeing their various misadventures. What will Higgins be berating Magnum about this time? Plus coming to visit the Anderson Estate ("Robin's Nest") during each episode is a special treat. What a place! If ever there was a perfect spot on the island to just live out the rest of your days this is it! Maybe not as it is today but certainly as it looks on the show. I really don't know why the carguments on the new FIVE-0 don't work for me but the bickering between Magnum and Higgins does. Maybe because MAGNUM never had any illusions about being a serious show. Maybe because Magnum and Higgins aren't partners working on some major homicide or in the middle of some high-speed pursuit or tracking down major terrorists while bickering like schoolboys. Maybe because Selleck and Hillerman are just better actors and can pull it off better. Or maybe because the spirit of the show is completely different. Or even the writing of the actual bickering is superior on MAGNUM.

Rainbow,

While you are correct that MAGNUM seems out of place in the serious world that we live in today, however that's actually one of the big reasons why I really appreciate the show today more than ever before. It's a time capsule of a simpler time. A time before ISIS, before mass shootings, before violent video games, before cell phones and drone technology and internet and Big Brother watching your every move. People were just more relaxed back then and knew how to enjoy life. That's the appeal of Magnum and his buddies when I watch the show today - carefree living in a tropical paradise. And Higgins was just perfect with his British stodginess to offset the carefree nature of the trio.

Added: Friday 04 December 2015 23:20:41 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Sad to hear the news of Robert Loggia and his passing on my timeline. His role as PI Russ Hendrix in Execution File one of the highlights in Season 11 Classic HFO. That could have been a real Classic episode had they developed more suspects. McG & HFO team suspected Hendrix early in the investigation and zeroed in on Russ. He shook Duke's tail and finished off another criminal. Enjoyed Loggia in the short-lived Mancuso FBI as well. He had a long and distinguished acting career. Would have been 86 January 2016. With Scott Weiland singer STP and other projects & Loggia passing last 24 hours, a tough 24 hours indeed. John

Added: Friday 04 December 2015 17:56:08 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Robert Loggia has passed away:

http://variety.com/2015/film/news/robert-loggia-scarface-dies-dead-1201654545/

Added: Friday 04 December 2015 17:14:03 MST


Submitted by: H50 1.0 FOREVER
From: Under the Live Oaks

Mr. Vanneman should pay more attention to his research and less attention to the concept of finding fault. Here are several mistakes in the article and footnotes:

(1) ˘There are no Ó Magnum sites online.÷ - - - There is an absolutely wonderful website, Magnum Mania! (http://magnum-mania.com/). It even pays homage to Hawaii Five-0 and names all 12 episodes that were filmed at the Anderson Estate. [The article dates from May 1, 2007. The Magnum Mania WWW site says it was launched on October 13, 2006. If you go to http://www.archive.org, the earliest reference to the site in their database is February 3, 2007. Sloppy research on the part of the article's author indeed! - MQ]

(2) ˘But Tom isnĂt proud. If the big screen wonĂt work for him, the little one will. HeĂs continued to work steadily in TV since the mid nineties and now has a semi-recurring role in made-for-TV flicks as Robert ParkerĂs ˘Jesse Stone.÷ - - - We could tell him now that Tom would go on since 2010 to star in yet another highly successful series, Blue Bloods.

(3) ˘Hillerman, who grew up as the son of a gas station owner in Deniston, Texas, evidently didnĂt care much for the frontier. He developed the fussy, bitchy Brit persona for the short-lived Ellery Queen series...÷ - - - Actually, John Hillerman is from Denison, Texas, which is not in the frontier, and now resides in Houston. He developed his British persona while appearing in Shakespearean theater. He did a fine job of creating a west Texas accent in several episodes of Magnum, PI, both in his Jonathan Quayle Higgins persona and in that of a half-brother who was said to hail from Hondo, Texas, which is in the frontier. That he could switch, back and forth, from one sentence to the next, seemed quite remarkable.

Added: Friday 04 December 2015 09:34:22 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Mike,

My favorite line from the article was this "the legendary Hawaii Five-O" they got that right eh Big Chicken!

Added: Thursday 03 December 2015 08:14:21 MST


Submitted by: John Chergi
From: Pittsburgh PA

Good Magnum PI Talk. Don't remember watching Magnum during its 80's run. Saw some episodes syndication Retro TV or maybe ME-TV recently. I remember 2 standout episodes one where Magnum was stranded at sea and another one where a fellow Vet was living in Hawaii rain forest area. The area was similar to Season 10 Elegy In A Rain Forest HFO. I never liked Higgins or his dogs. Anything about him. Didn't like Hillerman in Ellery Queen either. TC & Larry were good characters although I think Chin Ho & Danny as McGarrett's lieutenants better. One of the posters here made a good point about Magnum & Rockford Files. That's a pretty on the mark comparison. Can't remember a single episode title of Magnum but remember all 280 HFO titles. The few episodes watched with the battles of wills between Magnum & Higgins gets tiresome after awhile. I would give Classic Hawaii Five O an A and Magnum B grade for totality of series. John

Added: Tuesday 02 December 2015 20:07:03 MST


Submitted by: Mr. Mike
From: Vancouver

Here is an interesting article (over 8 years old) which talks about Magnum:

http://brightlightsfilm.com/tight-pants-paradise-tom-selleck-magnum-p/#.Vl85lF6rEdV

I never watched Magnum while it was on, but that is no great statement, because I don't think I watched hardly any TV during the 1980s. I just pulled up some "80 greatest TV shows from the 80s" web site, and I couldn't remember watching any of the shows there on a regular basis other than Siskel/Ebert and Saturday Night Live. I think I was too busy working hard and paying off my house during this decade.

I didn't see episodes of Magnum when it was originally on, and never liked it much since, though 20 years or so ago, it ran late at night here in syndication on one of the local US stations for ages. I have seen very few of the episodes, other than those which featured Elissa, because I wanted to grab screen shots of her for her site which I made (http://www.mjq.net/fiveo/elissa).

One positive thing about Magnum, though: in the mid-90's, I connected up with this fellow in the eastern US who had access to later seasons of Five-O that I had never seen which were being shown in the Philadelphia area, so we worked out a deal where I would tape Magnum here and he would tape Five-O there and we would trade tapes.

Added: Tuesday 02 December 2015 14:33:26 MST


Submitted by: Rainbow Warrior
From: New York, NY

Jon,

Interesting comments. I think you're right in one respect in that I didn't care for Magnum not because I disliked it or hated it, I was just apathetic about it. It was just there for me. I found it too offbeat, too laid back, jokey, just a different feel for me. I was glad it had success but it just didn't do it for me, so I never watched it. Most of the fans of the show that I knew in the 1980's were women who could not get enough of young Tom Selleck and loved him. There were a few references to the old Five-O but enough for me to watch each week, and you may forget that it was up against some powerful NBC shows in those days when NBC was truly the "must see network."

I have a pretty good eye in entertainment for shows that are really good and will last the test of time and I knew Magnum wouldn't be talked about once it went off the air, and it really hasn't been. The show wasn't really shown that much in re-runs where old Five-O still is, and it was a product of it's time. Very 1980's good time feel to it when our country was in a similar place. Now it's a troubled world and Magnum feels dated, where the old Five-O seems more relevant than ever and it's grittiness and drama have stood the test of time.

To sum up, no dislike here, but the old-Five 0 is a classic that has stood the test of time where Magnum was a 1980's hit and simply that. It's dated now, and it's telling that my favorite Magnum episode was the Frank Sinatra one which was very 1950's noirish.

Magnum was more like Rockford than the old Five-O and that probably is it.

Added: Tuesday 02 December 2015 08:15:56 MST


Submitted by: John H
From: Canada

Watched "Gunrunner" recently. Good solid story with a nice pace and build-up episode but not a top episode thanks to some so-so acting. Neat to see a lot of actual inside footage of the Andersen Estate (now the Obama estate?).

It was interesting to read your comments about the back story about the real life gunrunner, sure sounds like the source of the episode story.

The Estate made me think of Magnum P.I. which while I never watched when it was in production has come to be one of my favorite shows. I've always sensed a certain animosity towards this show from H5O fans, am I imagining it?

You'd think given the fact that they were two back to back shows both filmed in Honolulu (even in the same sound stage) that there would be more shared fans but that doesn't seem to be the case.

Maybe it's the very different "feel" of the shows? I remember back in the day when Magnum came it it seemed very fresh and modern while H50 seemed like an "old fashioned" 50-60's cop show.

Sort of like when a car is redesigned, the old one seems suddenly old and undesirable versus the trendy new one. But many years later when both are outdated the older one can be much more desirable.

I guess that a positive way to look at H52.0 is to take it as a compliment that our show had enough enduring value to attract a remix 40 years later, like an old guy getting a young wife!

Added: Tuesday 01 December 2015 15:45:53 MST


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